Happy Pi Day

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Kellemora
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by Kellemora »

My ice skates had laces, because you needed them tight.
The boots I was issued in the service also had laces, with LONG LACES, you wrap the excess around the top of the boot.
Or like most of us did, weaved the laces into the boot double thick at the lower end. At least we were allowed to do this.
I used to use a boot jack when I had really tight boots, had a good one that looked ugly, and a pretty brass one that wasn't worth the brass it was made out of, lousy at pulling a boot off.
The old steel one I had, had narrow bladed prongs and back, so it slid perfectly above the heel and welt and gripped good.

A man I worked for, only wore boots for nearly everything, and he had the neatest boot jack I've ever seen.
It had a foot rest on each side, and the claw in the middle, designed for use while sitting down.
I had never ever seen one like it for sale, else I would have bought one.

It hurts my feet to wear tie shoes, always has, so my school shoes were always tied very loose.
Besides that, shoes always cut the sides of my ankles, the underside of the ankle usually.
My grandpa showed me how to wet the leather and bend it outward, then soap it and let it dry with polo ball sitting in the shoe. That worked well, no more ankle blisters. But the tops of my feet always hurt in tie shoes.
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yogi
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by yogi »

Footwear is like computers. One size does not fit all. LOL It makes sense given that we are all build differently. Apparently while the design of the human foot is good, it's not stable. Things change with age. I don't think I can wear some of the old all leather shoes I did when I was a young man. I've grown to be comfortable with soft fabric shoes. Some of them have padding not found in expensive leather and that has become an issue now that my feet are more sensitive than they used to be. I still favor a tight laced shoe, but there are days when I have to loosen things up to allow for better circulation. The leather shoes I now own are fairly pliable and comfortable. The problem there is the cost. I hate to wear them very often which would accelerate their end of life, but then I think, why did I buy these shoes if I can't wear them as I please? LOL

I have too much time on my hands to think things over. Obviously
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Kellemora
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by Kellemora »

Before I started buying Ariat boots, I used to buy a new pair for Sunday's and/or dress up purposes.
The pair that used to be my Sunday pair, became my daily casual wear, but not for work.
What was my casual pair became the pair I wore for work.
When I was doing plumbing, I bought a BIG pair of galoshes that would fit over my boots.
Then a guy there got me hooked on fire-fighter boots to work in. I really liked them too.
But they were not only expensive, they were really heavy too, probably because they were so thick.
After I was done with plumbing and went on to become an electrician, that is when I started adding a car tire tread to the bottoms of my boots.
Good boots back then came with leather soles. And that added rubber sole was for protection against getting shocked so easily.
Then when I found out how long it made my boots last, I just got in the habit of doing it when boots went from casual to work.
But you just don't wear out the soles on these Ariat boots, hi hi.
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yogi
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by yogi »

Most of my career was spent in an office or a fairly clean factory environment. The clothing I wore was comfortable and not too formal. I figured that since I had an office job I should dress the part. Most the the technicians I worked with had other ideas about the proper dress code. A few times I was mistaken to be a manager. The management at Motorola did not wear ties as a matter of policy. There were special occasions when they dressed up, but even the owner of the company would walk through the plant in casual dress. First time I saw him I didn't believe he owned the place. LOL The idea was to be comfortable in your place of work. The wear and tear on my work clothes was minimal. I did a lot of walking back then which is the reason why I switched to cloth shoes. Some of the walking or running shoes had a feel to them that didn't tire my feet or make them sweat like the leather shoes. Now that I think back on it, I believe I reverted to leather shoes during the winter because they were warmer. On snowy days I woe ankle boots which probably would have benefited from your tire thread sole application.
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Kellemora
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by Kellemora »

Way back in the late 1960s, early '70s, when i was working for McDonnell-Douglas.
When I got transferred to the NASA division, they had shoe covers you had to put on if you were going into certain areas of the building.
I only bring it up, because how those shoe covers worked was something folks are only seeing after the year 2000.
You didn't put them on like the ones you see on TV crime shows.
There were two boxes outside the door, you stepped in while walking up to the door.
When you stepped in the box, pop, a shoe cover snapped up over your left shoe, and when you stepped forward into the next box, snap, that shoe got covered. A light elastic band around the top is what held it in place. But I never got to look close enough at those dispenser boxes to see how they worked. Like how did you only get one cover and not the whole box full, hi hi.

I never had occasion to go in any of the rooms where you had to wear a full body covering. But they were fairly simple also to put on also.
Speaking of which, Debi has a cousin who has worked on the Webb Space Telescope which is getting ready to launch on December 24th. She is so proud to have been a part of that project. Posted a gazillion pictures on Farcebook for years as it was under construction.

My curiosity got me. Here is a modern device that looks almost like what we used for shoe covers, only ours was embedded partly in the floor, and a little bigger.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BbtJ_QuuSAc
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yogi
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by yogi »

That automatic shoe covering machine is really interesting. I know people who won't let you come into their house unless you remove your shoes. This machine would be a great alternative. I guess it would be a courtesy to cater to the whims of such people, but personally I felt a little put out that I had to remove my shoes.

There was a "clean room" at Motorola where you had to cover just about all of you. your shoes, your hair, and body all had to be covered. I didn't work in the clean room, but we did have to wear anti static smocks in the factory and use a ground strap whenever we touched the production line. It was a nuisance at first, but became routine rather quickly. It seems that CMOS is very prone to being damaged by static and most of what we did involved CMOS technology. Oddly enough we did not have to wear shoe covering in the factory. I guess the ground strap was good enough.
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ocelotl
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by ocelotl »

As someone that also has been near electronics manufacturing for a bit over 20 years, I've also seen and worn some of the electrostatic protection attires used. Leather soles are static dissipative, so if you passed an antistatic checkpoint, there was no issue. A ground strap is good, if supported with air ionizing units, and a well installed dissipative flooring. What else can I say? I've mostly worn products with a CICEG (Cámara de la Industria del Calzado del Estado de Guanajuato - Guanajuato State Footwear Industry Chamber) number, including even safety shoes, so I don't have much experience regarding foreign made footwear.
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yogi
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by yogi »

Personally I think they overdid the static protection in the factory. However, when you have 5000 people assembled to create a static sensitive product, it's better to be safe than sorry. We had the ionizers in certain places but I don't think they did anything with the flooring. It was poured concrete and the production lines were bolted down into it. Static could be an issue, but I think the likelihood was very low.
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Kellemora
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by Kellemora »

When I worked on gaming machines, we had this little strap that went around our wrist, and a wire from it was clipped to the metal desk we did repairs on. If in the field, it was hooked to a grounding strap inside the machine, or to the chassis.

One of the other things we repaired there were touch-lamps. Quick and easy repairs that netted the box 35 bucks for each one we did. 99 out of 100 of them were just the thyristor and we got them for under 3 bucks each buying them by the case lots. Only took like 3 minutes to replace in most lamps, some may have taken 5 minutes.
Most of the time, I just had the customer wait, saved from writing up a call tag and doing paperwork.
If they waited, I made the repair and just rung up the sale in the register, hi hi.
I did have a few come in that I had to have them leave, because it had a capacitive type of circuit I had to check out, figure out what part wasn't working, and replace it. We still only charged them the 35 bucks, because this type was only like 1 in 100 that came in. Ironically, most of the lamps that did come in were from the lighting store up the street, so they came in with the customer tags on them already, and all I had to do was fix it and put it on their outbound table.

You can laugh at some of record keeping systems. For this lighting company, we had plastic tube on the wall, and little vinyl balls we would drop into the tube for each of their lamps we fixed. At the end of the week, we just counted how many balls were in the tube and sent that info to the billing department. Fast and simple, hi hi.
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yogi
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by yogi »

The wrist strap you describe was a very common item in all the tech labs I worked in. Static protection was a little more elaborate out in the production areas and we had to suit up whenever we were called out for service. When I was a production troubleshooter/analyzer there were very few failures of solid state components. That means static damage wasn't much of a problem. By far the majority of failures had to do with improper soldering, missing parts, or incorrect parts. I never did field service work, but I would guess that if static was such a big issue most of the products we made would come back for warranty repair. They didn't, and I doubt that the end users were wearing static protection gear.

I don't doubt that you were very creative in many ways, even with bookkeeping. I like the ball count story. It reminded me of using an abacus, or some such thing. I don't know if that kind of record keeping would go over very well these days. Billing people are very demanding. They want to see the paperwork and not just take your word for it. I think the reason they are so demanding is due to the accountants to whom they feed numbers. Accountants do nothing without the proper documentation.
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Kellemora
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by Kellemora »

The lighting store kept all the records of which customers belonged to which lamps they sent to us for repair. They came with a tag bearing a serial number. Now if they provided a tag with a tear off second serial number tag, we would have sent those to the billing department.
What I didn't mention, is they had a shipping form showing the number of lamps they dropped off, which we signed, and when they picked them up again, they gave us a pink copy from the back that they signed as receiving them back again.
It was only if we had one we couldn't fix right away, that it got one of our repair tags also, and they got a copy of that showing the serial number on the lamp tag, so their records jived. These particular lamps did not use the ball in the tube, hi hi.

I think I mentioned in the past about how my dad changed our order, filling, shipping, and billing forms.
In my grandpa's day, they had a large card the order was written down on. The signature card that got delivered attached to the flowers, after it was filled out by hand, with a ribbon, was tied to the order card, along with the delivery sticker.
When a designer filled the order, the signature greeting card went on the flowers, and after it was wrapped in tissue, the delivery sticker was stuck on the top of the package, then this card was put in the filled order box.
Book keeping would collect these cards and type up a statement to mail to the ordering customer. The card would then go into the accounts receivable file box, which was sorta like a tickler file in a way, separated in 1-month intervals. At the end of the month, those left from the previous month got sent a Past Due notice, which required typing up another statement and mailing it out. Then the card went into the Past Due box, which was also a ticker file. If paid it went to the accounting office.

My dad came up with a 3-part form to take the order on. The bottom of the top white page held the delivery sticker, this top white page also became the Invoice that was mailed to the customer. And like before, the signed greeting card was affixed by a ribbon to the order. This form was hung on a clip-board for the designers to fill the order. But unlike before, the form was not taken to the designers desk, it was just moved to a place on the clip-board that said being filled. After the order was filled, then the form got put in the filled box for the book-keepers.
They tore off the top white page and mailed it out, placed the pink page and the back cardstock page in the tickler file.
When a bill was paid, the pink form went into the paid box, and the card was sent to the accounting office marked Paid with the date and check number. The pink page was also used as a Receipt for walk-in customers.
A part of the delivery sticker from the front white page had a tear off strip for the drivers to turn-in as delivered. But was normally only used for private deliveries. It had enough room for a small note the drivers could make if needed. Such as no one home, delivered to the home on the east. Things like that.

This is what we did, up until I had the Lisa System installed. We had two order taking terminals in the back, and one out on the front counter. An order was displayed on a monitor in the back, and the designers could scroll up and down to find the one they were working on to mark it filled.
And another major change after we got the Wang System and a small button terminal at each designers desk. Each designer had a small monitor that showed the orders. Their buttons let them scroll up and down the orders, mark which one they were working on, and mark again when the order was filled and on the delivery tables.
In both cases, the Invoices were printed out by the computer to be mailed.
The accounting program in the computer had different levels of access, one for the billing department, and one for the accounting department that only they could see.
There was a box at the drivers station also where they punched a button on each order they put on their truck, and when they got back they would punch the buttons as the item being delivered was completed.
Right before we closed permanently, Wang added a Route Printer at the drivers station, so they could print out their stops in the order they would be run, which saved them from writing them down on cardboard strips they used.

If we were still in business, I'm sure each driver would have an electronic board they carried with them, hi hi.
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yogi
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by yogi »

If you were in business today everybody who touched an order would have a barcode scanner to track the progress of any given order. The delivery person would also have a scanner that he uses when the item has been delivered. He would also have a small tablet with a camera so that he can actually photograph where and when he placed the package should the customer not be there to receive it. The tablet would also have a touchpad form which the customer would sign to verify delivery. At that point the tablet would send an invoice via e-mail directly to the customer, or have one printed out to be mailed should the recipient not have access to e-mail. The tablet, by the way, probably would also have a map for the delivery person to follow. The software calculated the most efficient route and displays it for the driver to follow. And, of course, there would be a similar map in the office showing exactly where all the delivery trucks are at any given moment. At the end of the day all the business reports you could ever think of would be generated for management to peruse. A click of the mouse could reveal YTD figures with trend lines for sales/profits. There most likely would be no need for a purchasing agent because the barcode system would keep a perpetual inventory and order things automatically based on the business chart's projections. Payroll would also be included in the package, and in that case you might need an actual accountant to manage the cash flow.

And, if you were in business about 5-7 years from now, all those designers would likely be replaced by robotic arms and cameras. Well, maybe not. I know you are big on treating your employees well.

All I can add is that your family put a lot of thought into the business. It's no wonder it did so well for so long.
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Kellemora
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by Kellemora »

UPS, Fed-UP, and Medical Supply drivers are always at my house, and they ALL have those tablets you were talking about.

We HATE IT when Fed-UP makes a delivery here! We never know they were here, and they always hide the package somewhere outside, especially in an area we cannot see unless you walk a hundred feet and check the sides of the house, hi hi.
We've had many packages that Fed-UP delivered that got rained on, and in a few cases, the products inside ruined because of it.

Heck, even our USPS driver is smarter and has more common sense than a Fed-UP driver!
Most of them cannot even read plain English!
We have a sign in the driveway on a lamp post by the front partial sidewalk that reads in BIG LETTERS, ALL DELIVERIES TO REAR DOOR PLEASE! Then by the front door we have two more signs. DELIVERY TO BACK DOOR PLEASE, and another that says, DO NOT LEAVE PACKAGES ON THE STEPS, TAKE TO BACK DOOR.
So Fed-UP tosses the packages to the left of the steps behind the bushes, which is outside in the weather, and impossible to see there unless you walk all the way around to the front, climb the stairs and look behind the bushes. GRRR.
It is about 40 feet from my driveway to the front door, not all paved. It is only 6 feet from the driveway to my back door, all paved.
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Kellemora
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by Kellemora »

You and yours have a Very Merry Christmas Yogi!
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yogi
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by yogi »

I can't say I've ever had problems with deliveries from any of the popular services. My front door is less than 50 feet from the street at the end of the driveway where there is a short walk to the doorstep. It's pretty hard to miss the front door but that is where the variations occur. Nobody ever puts the package directly in front of the door. It's always somewhere else on the 4x8 concrete slab/porch. It is possible to leave a package at the edge of the step where the rain and snow can get at it, but most of the time they put the package close to the house but away from the door. The good news is that all I need do is look out the window in this computer room and have a view of 80% of that area. Frequently I can hear them plop down the box, but just as often I get an e-mail within minutes saying it was delivered. I've not noticed FedEx being any more Neanderthal than the rest of the delivery services, but as I say there is little room for error in our situation. A lot of the sites I order from have a box for "delivery instructions" wherein you can specify dropping things off at the back door. I'm sure that would increase your chances of getting things in the right place about 50% of the time. LOL You certainly must be aware that those delivery people are on a schedule and have strict rules the company gives them about when and how to deliver packages. To be honest I don't think they pay any attention to the signs you have posted. It's not in the SOP for deliveries.


Thank you for the Christmas wishes my friend. It's a blessing that both of us are still above ground and able to exchange greetings. Well, at least as of the time I'm writing this. We are enjoying an air temperature of 71F here on Christmas Eve. They say it will be warmer tomorrow. No, I have not moved to Puerto Rico. We are still in O'Fallon. I love the warmth but in a strange perverted kind of way I also miss the snow. The last Christmas that was this warm in Chicago was followed by record breaking cold in January following. They say it's not likely this year, but does anyone really know? Regardless, I send my sincere wishes for a comforting and enjoyable Christmas to you and your wife, Deb. May we continue this exchange of wishes for many years to come.
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Kellemora
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by Kellemora »

When I delivered flowers, since they were a perishable gift, we always went to the front door.
Got chewed out a few times from folks who did have signs saying All Deliveries to the Back Door.
But we didn't consider ourselves as making deliveries in the same sense as a box of something.

In some cases, it was because the folks couldn't get to, or didn't use their front door. Which is understandable.
If that was the case and they hollered out the window, we would take it to their back door.

But the way my house is set up, the front porch was enclosed to make Debi a small studio, which never got finished.

Debi's sisters husband, who was here today for Christmas dinner is 80 years old and still working every day. Amazing.

I'm happy in this side of the daisy patch, never liked the looks of roots too much anyhow, hi hi.
But I think our day is coming, and probably a lot sooner than we hope for too.

I know I've gone downhill considerably this past year, and a little faster these past few months too.
I'm to the point, it is an effort to breathe, even with using O2.
At least I managed to get some of those medications I couldn't afford, and they do help a lot.

I got some more jigsaw puzzles to put together, and some crossword puzzle books as well.
So now I have more than I will probably get assembled before I croak.
Even so, I like doing them.

Merry Christmas to you and yours Yogi!
I'll tell the gang you said hello!
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yogi
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by yogi »

I was recently reminded of my mom's passing. She was diagnosed terminal one day while in the hospital. Only a couple days at the most was the pronouncement. So, as a dutiful son, I told mom what the doctors said. She looked a little confused and assured me she wasn't going to check out at this time. She was in intensive care and they bent the rules a bit to allow nearly twenty of us into her cubical for a final good-bye. They said it would be ok if we didn't make any noise to disturb the other patients. Well, there we were. All twenty of us as somber as could be watching mom and all those tubes and machines connected to her to record the ending. After about an hour mom couldn't take it anymore. She scolded us. Asked why are we so sad? There is nothing anybody can do about it so just accept it, and party. Well, since she was terminal all restrictions on diet were removed and it didn't take long for a bucket of iced cream to show up and a bottle whiskey. There were a few other goodies as well. Mom declined the whiskey but felt relieved that she was off all those damned meds and could eat whatever the heck she wanted. So she did. And we did party to the point were the nurse came in to tell us we had to settle down or leave. As it happened, mom didn't die that day, nor the next, nor the next. So they sent her home on hospice care and sure enough, two and a half years later she passed away. In fact she lived so long that the hospice people wanted to take her off the program.

I don't know for certain why it happened the way it did. Mom had COPD and a few other problems too, but I don't think she was as bad as you are today. I like your attitude about the inevitable, but it is sad to think about nonetheless. I'm not sure you are in a partying mood at this stage, but I have a feeling mom's attitude and all the prayers people were sending her way had some positive effect. People still talk about it 13 years later. She was an amazing woman and snubbed her nose at the experts. She did it HER way and in HER time. I have the impression you are doing something similar. :mrgreen:
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Kellemora
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by Kellemora »

Sorta sounds like my mom in a way.
Debi and I just visited her back home and she was just fine. A little tired is all.
When we got home, a day later my sister called and told us mom became ill.
And that we should plan on coming back up there in two weeks.
Since my sister was a lifelong RN she usually could tell things most other folks couldn't.
We stayed in touch daily by phone.
I had an order I didn't want to turn down, which I knew took four days to do, so I asked my sister if I had at least four days before driving up there again. She said sure, no problem.
No sooner than I started the culturing of the enzymes to do the order, well a day later, she called and said mom won't make it through the night. I told her I couldn't leave for two more days. She got mad at me and blew her top.
After the enzyme culture was ready, I stayed up all night to get the order finished and ready to go.
Hired a neighbor to sit at my house to wait for the UPS driver, then lock up and go home.
With no sleep I hit the road, 9 hours drive to get home.
Mom did hang on until I got there, and once she knew I was there, she was happy.
She kept hanging on for another four hours after I was there, and then she passed away.

As far as ME, I know I won't be able to get the things ready and sold that I want to, and don't really worry that much about it.
I figure as long as I keep a smile on my face, and keep the oath of grin and bear it until the end. It won't leave any time to get depressed about it. I know I have to go someday, I just hope it is not right away, at least not quite just yet, hi hi.
Despite what the doctors keep preaching about, I think I'll be around for some time yet, even if I feel like I'm dead already, hi hi.

I hope you had a wonderful Christmas out there Yogi.
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yogi
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by yogi »

Once again I must say that the future is not ours to see, and I like your attitude. It's more or less positive and mind over matter is a proven fact. So, if you should outlast me by some chance, I'd like you to continue the tradition and carry on the affairs of this website, Oh, don't worry about it too much. I pay the rent here by the month and it should only take a few months after I'm gone for my survivors to figure out how to turn off the automatic payments. :lol:

Christmas here was a mixed bag. We were scheduled to go up to Chicago and have a reunion with the family after a two year abstinence due to the pandemic. In the past there were actually some travel restrictions in Illinois and I was not going to stay in a hotel for the 3-4 days we normally would. This year it seemed safer until the latest version of the deadly virus emerged. Two people who were to attend the gala came down with the virus so that the hostess called it off at the last moment. One of those two is her son. It's just as well because I am more hesitant to take any risks than is the average bear and did not have good feelings about being on the road or in a big crowd even if we were all family celebrating Christmas.

So, that meant we got to stay home again this year, which made me feel slightly better. But Christmas is about family and sharing the love. I'm pretty much a loner and probably made it through all this isolation better than the rest of the party animals, but it would have been nice to get out of O'Fallon for a few days. Thank goodness for the Internet. My oldest granddaughter set up a Zoom meeting and several of us met that way for about an hour. We did the chit chat routine and didn't have to worry about hugs vs elbow bumps. So that part was nice. After the Zoom session I started on the fish, the Dover Sole we got as a gift from the two daughters. As they say, I flew by the seat of my pants making it. It wasn't exactly like I remember it back in the old days, but it was pretty darned close. My guess is we are the only people in O'Fallon, probably in the entire state of Missouri too, to have access to Dover Sole. It was special to say the least.

Wife got me some gourmet pop corn, which I know you have some experience with. I've been making my own since Schnucks decided not to stock the Chicago made stuff anymore and learned a thing or two about popping corn. The best advice I found was to use coconut oil; 1/2 TBSP per ounce of corn kernels. Then toss in some flavoring, which usually would be salt. Don't put butter in because that would spoil the flavor of the coconut oil not to mention do more harm to the arteries - or so they say on the popcorn website. As it happens, my popcorn is better than that Chicago stuff. My wife of many years witnessed all this and decided I need some gourmet kernels. I now have six different kinds of popcorn, one of which is blue. In addition to that she got ten bottles of flavoring salt. Well they don't all have salt, but the flavorings are very odd for popcorn. One is dill, for example. So, some day I will have some dill flavored popcorn and probably tell you all about it right here. :mrgreen:
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Kellemora
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by Kellemora »

It is very hard to find good popcorn anymore, at any price.

When I first moved down here, there was a hot dog and popcorn stand, situated in the middle of a parking lot.
Originally it was a Woofies before becoming Pop Eddies. He had more early morning coffee business than Starbucks ever hoped to have, hi hi. I don't drink coffee, but from what I heard, his was the best, and 2/3 cheaper too.
His hot dogs were also the greatest. Although he wanted to be primarily popcorn, it didn't turn out that way, hi hi.
The coffee is what took off for him. He did a great business, then his location got sold to an apartment developer. Never heard that he opened up again anywhere in this area.

I really don't know anyone down here. I tried to make friends with the neighbors, but the ones I made friends with have died now. After Debi's mom passed away, a got a small poker game going, 25 cent limit so nobody got burned hi hi. It lasted all of about 3 years then folks moved away, and the others wanted higher stakes games. Since I didn't want that, they started going somewhere else. Which was actually fine by me, I always lost anyhow, hi hi.

Back home I had a lot of friends, but the only called when they wanted me to do something for them. Ask them to do something for me and they were always busy, or if they did do it, it was never right.
So I'm happy being a loner!
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