Happy Pi Day

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yogi
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by yogi »

I'm pretty sure the building codes in Cook County didn't coincide with what was going on in St Louis at the time. These holes and notches I talked about were all inspected by the city before I was given a residency permit. The holes in the joists bothered me but I never seen the notch in the 2x10 until we had the house inspected prior to selling it. There were no steel plate reinforcements and no backing of wood. As you can tell I was (and still am) naive regarding home construction and let the "professionals" use their best judgment. They did what cost them the least amount of time and money, I'm sure.

The scratch in the stove top is shallow and small, but it is noticeable. At the moment it is discolored due to the lack of polish and that is what I'm trying to fix in reality. The scratch is not near the burners and everything else works as intended. I just can't recall doing anything that would have made that scratch. The surface is really hard and normal pot shaking doesn't seem to affect it.
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Kellemora
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by Kellemora »

If it is a porcelain top, since you have a gas stove if I recall, in that case you could touch it up.
I thought you were talking about a glass/ceramic cooktop.
They do have little bottles of touch up paint for porcelain that heat helps to cure instead of burn out.
It is probably more like ceramic paint?

It could be what was in your house passed code, but codes change, and when you went to sell, they had to go by the new codes.
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yogi
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by yogi »

Just to refresh your memory, I'll tell you that the cooking stove in the kitchen, the one with the scratch, is electric. The cook top is very hard and glasslike. I don't really know what it is made of but would be surprised if it's not ceramic. In our distant past we did in fact have a gas stove with a porcelain top. In more modern times that was changed to stainless steel. Here in O'Fallon there are no gas cooking stoves that I know of. We have electric and I dislike it for a range of reasons.

Yes indeed the building codes do change. We had that last house built for us and lived there over twenty years. When we saw the writing on the wall and knew we would be moving we replaced all the windows which happened to be casement style. The new windows were Pella and all wood with metal cladding. I love them. However, we could not replace the bedroom windows with casement style. That was against the current building code. They had to be double hung in the bedrooms so that a person could crawl out and through them in case of fire. So there had to be a mix of double hung and casement due to changes in the building code over the prior 20 years.
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Kellemora
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by Kellemora »

Yes, cooktops are made using ceramics. The one on my old soapstone stove was ceramic but clear as glass.

We replaced casement windows with side to side slider windows in the older homes I renovated. But only on the back and side. The front of the house always got nice looking windows, which was usually double hung.
All we replaced were ThermoPane!
All habitable rooms (meaning bedrooms) must have two means of egress into separate areas or outside.

Many houses I worked in had galley kitchens, and one of the things I had to do most often was add a door to a garage, or to outside, our in some way provide two exits from the galley kitchen. In one house a way into the basement did suffice, but only because it was a split level basement with a walk-out.
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yogi
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by yogi »

I'm not sure about the building codes in the old place, but we had one of those galley kitchens. At the entry point there was a door to the garage and opposite that door was the door to the basement. The basement was conventional but it had a large fire escape type window at one end of it. Thus if you were trapped down there you could get out through the window assuming you could crawl out from below ground level. LOL That wall was 8 feet tall and the window came down to the 3-4 foot level off the floor. Then there was another 3-4 feet from the bottom of the window well to the back yard. I'm not sure it would be possible for us to actually get out that way, but apparently it complied with the building code of the time. We lived dangerously in that house too. No fire extinguishers anywhere. I always meant to get one for the kitchen but never got around to it.
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Kellemora
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by Kellemora »

All of the houses in my dad's subdivision had the usual casement style tilt in basement windows, which a thin person could escape through if necessary, since they lifted right out when opened.
But when my first wife and I stayed there for a short time, we did have a window on the back of the house made larger. Same width but 2 feet down from the original making an 18 x 36 inch opening. We used that size because we could get a basement style window that size for cheap from the supply house. If you opened the window, it opened like a pair of shutters and wrapped around flat against the wall. We did remove the Pyracantha Bushes that were by that window and replace them with two Yews on either side of the window. Wouldn't want to try and escape through a Pyracantha hedge with all the sharp needles on them. Dad planted them to keep folks from trying to break in through a basement window, or climb in one of the children's bedroom windows, or the kids escaping at night that way, hi hi.

We have a fire extinguisher in the kitchen, and I have one here in my office. The ones we buy are good for five years. So the new one goes into the kitchen, the one in the kitchen goes to my office, but the gauge still shows full, and the one in my office was put just inside the garage door, and it still reads good also, no meter on that one, just a push button you use to test it. I figure if the button pops back up, it is still usable, even if it is over 10 years old now. We got rid of the big old soda and liquid one as the rubber hose on it turned brittle and would probably break if we touched it.
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yogi
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by yogi »

I like the idea your dad had when he planted Pyracantha bushes. The front of our old house had bushed under the windows but the back did not. And, of course, the front faced the street and was well lit, but the back faced the forest with only the gods know what hiding in there. We all had one acre lots so that the neighbors were not exactly close by to hear anybody breaking into the back of the house. Apparently there were burglaries in the neighborhood, but we were lucky to be spared. Then again, we had the smallest house on the block that looked pretty shabby compared to the neighbors. One of them with a magnificent 5000 sq ft house was in fact broken into. His home was a couple hundred feet back from the street with trees and bushes more or less concealing the house. It also concealed the bad guys doing their dirty work. That house looked as if it could have some valuable stuff in it.

I read about fire extinguishers once. There are certain types for kitchen grease fires. A different type if your curtains were on fire. And yet another type for your average garbage can fire. To be perfectly safe we should have had all three kinds. I did have a small grease fire in the kitchen one day, and that was confined to the pan it was in. It spooked me a bit and from that time forward I'd keep a wet towel in the sink ... when I thought of doing it. :mrgreen:
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Kellemora
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by Kellemora »

I'm the one who dad elected to trim those suckers every fall too, and he was very picky about how they were trimmed, hi hi.
I guess I shouldn't laugh, I now trim my bushes in the same manner and am just as picky as he was, hi hi.

I forget the letters on the fire extinguishers, but they are all multi-purpose types.

As far as grease fires on the stovetop, we have what looks like a stainless steel cake cover that is large enough to fit over any of our frying pans, and it has a slot cut in it for the handle. Inside this cover is a floating flat steel plate held in place by a very light spring almost as large in diameter as the lid. There is a special slot in a cabinet it fits in, so it can be retrieved and used fast if needed. We've never needed to use it. Knock on simulated wood grain!

My grandma, who had a gas stove, seemed like she had a grease fire more than most folks. But then too, she did fry a couple of pounds of bacon every single morning for grandpa. She had an old apron she scorched and kept it near the sink also, ready to wet and use when the frying pan flared up.

We'll never forget the day she was using the broiler, which on a gas stove was underneath the oven, where the pot and pan drawer is on electric stoves. I don't remember what she was cooking, pork steaks probably. But her stove caught fire, so much so that fire was even coming out the two vents on top of the stove for the oven and broiler.
Thankfully, the whole family was there and using baking soda and wet rags managed to get the fire out. But not before the stove was ruined. She also had a clear plastic film over the wallpaper above the stove area, with copper cake forms hanging up there, and a skillet or two. That plastic curled up and wrapped itself around the hanging items.
That was one way to get a new stove, and the kitchen cabinets repainted, hi hi
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yogi
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by yogi »

There are fire extinguishers that spew out foam, liquids, or gas and they all have their special purpose. There is a lot of overlap and I suppose multi purpose extinguishers are possible. I do most of my cooking with olive oil and have been warned that it has a low flash point. I am sure the flaming pan I talked about was filled with olive oil. But, it has its health benefits and so far I've been pretty lucky. No fires of major proportions yet.

I read an article once that told me I was using the drawer under the oven incorrectly if I stored my pots and pans in it. The intended purpose for it is as a food warmer. Frankly I don't believe the one in our stove would serve that purpose but it does seem like a readily available space if you don't mind bending down that much. There are kitchens with proofing drawers, usually for making breads, but that's not the same idea. At the old place we had two ovens, a smaller one on top of a full sized one. The smaller oven was ideal to keep things warm during the cooking process.

Trimming the rose bushes was always a challenge for me. I avoided it as much as possible because I'd always be attacked by the thorns. There probably are tools and techniques to avoid that, but I didn't have any of those.
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Kellemora
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by Kellemora »

Multi-purpose fire extinguishers put out a white powder normally in a huge fog like spray pattern.

The stove I put in our house has two ovens, a narrow one at the top and a normal one at the bottom. No bottom drawer at all.
The stove we got rid of did have a drawer at the bottom, but was only used to keep lids and a few other rarely used items.

Rose thorns point downward. So when you reach into a rose bush you do so in a downward motion, and then after you cut the rose stem, you continue in a downward and outward motion. Some of the leaves can still get you but they are usually soft and don't bite too bad, hi hi.
We had two greenhouses that were all roses, for cut roses. Plus each year we had to do a major cut back as well, so all the roses we cut during that time had a dog leg in them, which we usually removed later.

Yesterday it got above 72 degrees, today it won't even break 60 degrees.
I sorta like Global Warming myself, hi hi.
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yogi
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by yogi »

There are thorny roses, and there are THORNY ROSES. Some of the stems had thorns about as large as my pinkie fingernail. If I recall correctly, those pointed out at a 90 degree angle from the stem. Most of the bushes I had just had small thorns all over. Even the leaves had serrated edges which would often stick me. Roses were always a challenge to grow consistently. Those from Jackson Perkins would look lovely the first year. But after that it was a struggle to keep them looking lovely. The most obnoxious problem that plagued me was that black spot mold that roses love to cultivate.

The bottom drawer of the kitchen stove in O'Fallon has all the wrappings I use: parchment paper, foil, cling wrap, and an assortment of plastic bags. All the pots and pans are in the pantry because we really don't have a good space to hang them in the kitchen.
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Kellemora
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by Kellemora »

Hmm, if they got that way, you were not trimming them back far enough at years end. I know it is hard on the brain to cut back past the year old node, but you have to with rose bushes. Else they will begin to look pretty rough.
Don't worry, I won't get into the three year growth stages specifically for cut roses.

You are lucky the heat from the oven didn't melt your plastic bags and fuse your rolls of food service film.

I have a long canvas tube we stick our plastic bags in. I used a 5 inch diameter steel ring I had laying around for the top to hold it open, and to sew the hanging strap from. The bottom of the tube had an old garbage disposer finned rubber piece when I made it, but when it became a nuisance, I cut it out and added some elastic at the bottom to hold it only closed a tiny bit, still a 2 to 3 inch opening at the bottom to pull bags out from the bottom.

One year, when I had several child sized pairs of jeans, I made a dozen of these and gave them away as Christmas presents.
The reason was, folks who came to our house for holidays always loved it and asked where we got it from. So I decided to do that for them a year or two later. I didn't have the steel rings for the tops, so used a heavy zip tie which is sewed inside the hem, so nobody knows what is in there holding it open, hi hi. I also added a grommet in the top center of the strap in case they used a cup hook to hang it from. And you can laugh, but I sewed a narrow piece of lace around the top and bottom also, hi hi.
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yogi
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by yogi »

I never thought about the heat from the oven damaging the stuff I keep in the bottom drawer. It's an interesting observation on your part because that oven is the one I use to make pizza with the temperatures well over 400 F. I guess the oven is well insulated, or something, because the heating coil is at the bottom of the oven only a few inches away from the top of that drawer.

The plastic zip bags I buy come in a box that is it's own dispenser. I have about six or seven things side by side down in that bottom drawer and everything is easy to access. The cling wrap is always a challenge because, well, it clings top it self and is difficult to pull off the roll. I got one of those special designed holders that has a zipper type knife blade across the top and is intended to make cutting sheets to size easy. The cutting is easy but retrieving the the plastic off it's roll is usually a challenge. I found a type of wrap that is sticky on one side and can be used to seal itself much like a vacuum pack. That stuff does not have the same static quality as the cling wrap and is a lot easier to dispense and handle. It doesn't stretch as well but it does seal a bowl well enough for my purposes.
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Kellemora
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by Kellemora »

I guess yours had good insulation around the oven box.

I used to have a restaurant grade food service film dispenser, but normally we just use the film right out of the box. It too has a saw blade that sticks up from the front edge to tear it off. On top of the lid between the hole the film comes out of, and the cutter bar is a tacky-strip. Sorta like double faced tape, but not tape on the top, it is more rubbery, but the film sticks to it, just enough it doesn't fall back down into the box. If it gets to where it doesn't hold the film for you, you can wipe the dust off of it with a wet rag and it is like new again. This rubbery stuff is sort of like what is used on washable lint rollers. Getting it wet doesn't make it more sticky, just cleans off the dust so it sticks again.
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yogi
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Re: Happy Pi Day

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I've read where that bottom drawer under the oven is not intended to be a storage space. It is, however, designed to keep food warm. That could be true for some stoves, but obviously not in all cases. The stove we have here in this kitchen must indeed be well insulated. That actually surprises me if it's true because most of the stuff they put into the kitchen was the minimum they could get away with at a low cost. We had a much better oven up north, but that one didn't have a drawer. It had a second oven instead which proved to be more useful than a warming drawer. I really don't know what commercial oven users would need in the ideal case, but that warming space would be something I'd expect on a professional oven. Then, too, there are ovens dedicated just to that purpose.

I like the sound of that tacky cutter bar, but nothing I can get at Schnucks has that feature. There is one brand of cling wrap that has a single sticky spot on the outside of the box and below the saw tooth blade. That does in fact hold the wrap in place between cuttings. However, pulling the wrap out of the box and off the roll can be quite a challenge in that the wrap sticks to itself and is difficult to pull off the roll. You might think that is due to where I keep it under the stove, but I have the same problem if I keep it in the cool pantry. So, the best solution for the time being is that not so clingy sticky wrap that I can seal.
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Kellemora
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by Kellemora »

I know the ovens that get built into wood cabinets have an amazing amount of insulation on them.
But who knows, maybe they all do now.

Most of the food service film sold commercially is removed from the box and placed on a metal dispenser.
Those boxes did not come with a cutter or with the tacky strip.
The kind they sell at Sam's Club and other stores like that, have the box and cutter, but no tacky strip.
However, you could find those tacky strips on display at some kitchen small appliance stores that sell things like spice racks and cookware items.
A small store here named Sally's Kitchen, had them and other interesting things the last time I was there, a couple of years ago now.

Some of the high end commercial film dispensers have a pedal on the floor. You hold the edge of the film, step on the pedal and pull it out while stepping on the pedal, then let off the pedal as you go to cut the film. You don't usually see that kind in restaurants, but they are used heavily in butcher shops, and meat packaging places in stores.
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yogi
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by yogi »

My mom had a Chambers gas stove exactly like the one in this picture (I can't believe I was able to find it).


Image


Talk about well insulated. She was in love with the oven in that it was brick lined. I was disappointed when I discovered the bricks were not like house bricks but more like thick tiles made of stone. She also liked those valves for the gas burners because you had to push down on the lever above the handles in order to turn the handle, which in turn lit the burner. Those levers were removable so that you could prevent the handles from inadvertently being turned, especially by some little kid who didn't know better. I was old enough to know better and a single child so that I didn't really get why she liked those levers so much. The most interesting part of this stove is that cover in the upper right corner. It was called a deep well and had three triangular containers inside, at least ten inches deep would be my guess. The idea was that you could steam cook three different things in the deep well instead of using the burners with pots and pans. And, of course, that rectangle on the left was a griddle that was hinged at the back. Underneath was a broiler. That was one amazing cooker.

Dang, I'd be willing to trade my car for a stove like that if I could do it today. :mrgreen:
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Kellemora
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by Kellemora »

Wow! I spotted that deep well right away. Every stove my mom ever had always had a deep well, and the newer ones you could actually lift the burner up from the bottom so you had another burner on top.
She accidentally turned it on once and melted the bottom out of her deep well pot.

I wish I had some pictures of that Side by Side GE Monitor Refrigerator with the big rings on top that held the compressors.
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yogi
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by yogi »

You could be right about that deep well burner having the ability to be raised to the top. That is only a vague memory in my mind. We lived with my mom the first year we married and my wife remembers using that stove. That was 55 years ago. I'm trying to think of a downside for that stove but am coming up blank. The only bad thing is that it cannot be found for sale anymore.
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Kellemora
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Re: Happy Pi Day

Post by Kellemora »

I'm not sure how a deepwell worked in a gas stove. Seems if it could be lifted up, the chance of breaking a flexible pipe would increase quite a bit. But all the electric deepwell stoves, the burner could be raised.
The deepwell was more efficient than using a pot on the top, because inside the deepwell was insulated, so less energy was used for cooking.
I think the crock pot has more or less replaced the deepwell stoves.
And since people make more money these days, pinching pennies while cooking has falling by the wayside.
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