Ordering Online

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yogi
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Ordering Online

Post by yogi »

This about sums it up ...



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Kellemora
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Re: Ordering Online

Post by Kellemora »

Sounds about right, except you left out the part about FedEx drivers not knowing how to read.
They would rather walk 65 feet to hide a package out of view, than walk 6 feet to the main entrance.
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yogi
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Re: Ordering Online

Post by yogi »

I have a lot of respect for the FedEx drvers; well, at least the one that used to have us on his route about two years ago. I ordered a gun safe from a place in South Carolina. I don't have any guns to store, but the safe was the right size for my needs and reasonably priced. It weighed 130 pounds and I wondered to myself how they would deliver it. Then, one day I got an e-mail from FedEx saying the safe was on it's way to my house. I didn't think they handled anything that heavy, but obviously they do. I saw the truck pull up and the driver go to the rear and open the doors to extract my safe. I was totally blown away to see him pick it up - all 130 pounds - and carry it into my garage for me. It didn't seem to phase him at all. The ultimate destination for the safe was my basement and there was no way in Hell I could carry it down there. I happen to have a hand truck that has four wheels so that I can lay it flat on it's back and haul big items that way. The problem was I could not lift the safe onto the truck so that I could wheel it down the slope on the side of my house leading to my basement door. A couple months later my wife's sister came to visit. All three of us lifted it onto the hand truck which allowed me to move it to it's final resting place. It's STILL on that hand truck today. I suppose I could push it off and let it fall where it may, but then it might damage the concrete floor. It's permanent home is likely to be that cart, which will make it a lot easier on anybody who wants to break in and steal it.
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Kellemora
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Re: Ordering Online

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The soapstone stove I bought was really heavy, I would guess around 600 pounds.
I managed to get it off a pick-up truck and into my living room using only boards to slide the crate on.
But to get it from there out to the den two steps lower, I had to use a come-along through a hole in the ceiling to a pipe I laid across 4 rafters. I managed to do it all by myself though. I'm still surprised at that.

Most of my machine shop and woodworking equipment came by motor truck with a lift gate and pallet jack.
They only brought things as far as my front porch, or into the carport, and that was it.

All of my file cabinets here are on a plywood board with wheels, so is my chest freezer in the house.
Makes it easy to move them around when need be. However, in my office, everything is packed so tight, I don't even have room to move the file cabinet blocking the power outlet for my strip heater, so can't plug it back in again, hi hi.

One of these days I'll have more room again, at least that is what I keep telling myself, as more and more stuff keeps ending up in here, hi hi.
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yogi
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Re: Ordering Online

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My gun safe story is a reminder to me that I'm getting old. About twenty years ago I bought a treadmill. It weighed in around 220 lbs and the truck driver was nice enough to put it in my garage for me. The final destination for this piece of equipment was in the basement which was 13 steps down from the kitchen. The kitchen was three steps up from the garage where the treadmill rested. The unopened shipping crate would not fit on the basement stairs. Thus I had to remove the carton but leave the machine on the cardboard and whatever packing material was supporting it. This arrangement gave me about three inches of spare room on the staircase. I was able to pull the 220 lb monster along the garage floor by grabbing onto the remaining packing material. Getting it up the three stairs into the kitchen proved to be quite a chore but only required me to lift about half the weight about 8 inches per step. It slid across the ceramic kitchen floor easily and I was able to line it up with the stairs going down to the basement. I was going to slide it down the stairs, but I wasn't sure if I should be in front of the load or in back of it. I chose to be in front and to pull it down under the assumption that there would be less damage to the machine if it decided to slide down too quickly. The ER was only 5 minutes form the house, so what could go wrong? LOL

There was a lot more friction than I expected between the stairs and the cardboard box. The slide down hill was fairly controlled but there was some damage to a couple stair edges. A little glue and nails fixed the damage. The treadmill had casters on it and once it was in the basement it was quite easy to move around to where I wanted it. However, looking back on the whole incident I could never duplicate it today. I'm really really glad we have this walk-in basement arrangement. It made life a whole lot easier for several large items that ended up in the basement. I don't see how I will ever get them up the hill if we ever have to more out of here. But, that's a problem for some other day.
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Kellemora
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Re: Ordering Online

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When I closed down my machine shop, I had to have all of it placed in the living room of our house. Most of the machines ran on 208 triple phase which is not available in residential areas. Took me a couple of years to sell those machines off, which didn't make the frau none to happy. But the funds from that is what got her a new kitchen.
My woodworking shop did go to the basement, but I had to hire a moving team to get that stuff down there. They had the right equipment to get the machines down to the basement. The stair-walker they had was amazing. It held whatever you put on it perfectly level as it traversed the stairs. They only needed this for two of the machines, the rest they just teamed up and carried them down by hand. Then later when I had the auction, four guys carried everything up those steps and took them outside for the auction. Nobody believed how much stuff I had amassed over the years, and after closing down so many diverse businesses. It was sad to see how cheap some of the things sold for, but in the end, I made enough to be totally debt free, and without filing bankruptcy either. But in hindsight, I would have been better off if I did though.
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yogi
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Re: Ordering Online

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The most amazing move I ever witnessed was when we bought a new refrigerator for the old house. Part of the deal was for them to remove and haul away the old fridge. As I mentioned in another post the kitchen was three steps up from the garage. The refrigerators weighed a few hundred pounds and was very tall making for a high center of gravity. But two guys did the move easily. They had a hammock type sling that went under the fridge. Then there were straps like an apron on either end of the sling which they put around their necks and shoulders. It was all adjusted so that when they both stood erect the fridge was a few inches off the floor. They walked it through the kitchen easily and only hesitated slightly when negotiating the three steps. Neither one of them did anything more than a knee bend. It totally amazed me, but to them it was old hat. LOL
Last edited by yogi on 10 Apr 2021, 22:56, edited 1 time in total.
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Kellemora
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Re: Ordering Online

Post by Kellemora »

The first time I moved from an apartment into a house, I bought a new stove and fridge. One Guy delivered both, by himself, and carried them up the short flight of stairs using a method something like you described. He had these wide straps that went over his shoulders, and other straps that went under the appliances. The only hard part was when he had to duck down to clear the top of the door and turn a corner at the same time. The stove, although longer, was much easier for him to bring in. I guess it was both lighter, and the way he carried it was a little different. The bottom of the stove was against his back.
Other than there, I never lived anywhere with steps to the main floor, other than one shallow step up. And everything delivered to that house they used dollies. Well except the upright freezer that went to the basement, but there too they used a dolly.

The most amazing thing I had to have moved was a Baby Grand Piano. Mom was going to sell it back in 1966 when they moved to Ballwin, and I told her I would like to have it. There was no room at her new house for it, so I had it moved to a storage locker until I got married and got an apartment. I had it moved there, but decided to leave it when I moved out. Which was OK with management because the new tenant knew I would leave it for them, which helped clinch the higher rent they had to pay, hi hi.
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yogi
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Re: Ordering Online

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Movers know all kinds of tricks. Most of them involve simple leverage. That's how I moved the 220 lb treadmill. Picking up only one end reduced the load by half. When I worked out back in my forest and had to move huge tree trunks, using the right kind of leverage made things a lot easier. If that didn't work, I just used the chain saw to cut the trunks into manageable sizes. I would not have the faintest idea about moving a grand piano. My daughter has an upright and she had to hire a special moving company to make sure it arrived safely at it's destination. My oldest daughter lives in Florida and they just sold their condo so that they can move closer to where the SIL works. They solved the furniture moving problem by selling nearly all the furniture along with the condo. That seems to be a popular way to do things in Florida. They just closed the deal on a new apartment today and will spend the next few days shopping for all new furniture. Somebody else will be moving it for them. This apartment, by the way, is not too far from Orlando. We will probably go down there to visit one day, and a tour of Epcot Center will be on the agenda. :mrgreen:
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Kellemora
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Re: Ordering Online

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When I lived in an apartment, every stick of furniture I bought was bought sized to fit the space in which it would sit.
Since it was an apartment, I had to take everything with me when I moved out. It just didn't fit right in my new house.
So I ended up selling most of it, or donating it.
My house here is almost the same way. I pity the person who thinks they can move my bedroom set out of the bedroom, hi hi.
At my old house, I had to remove a window and some studs to get a main component of it into my house. Mainly because the manufacturer messed up and didn't make it in two pieces like they were supposed to do.
I moved it into our master bedroom here while the bedroom was being constructed, because I knew it would not end up in there in any other way. There is no possible way you can turn it to get it out of the room, hi hi.

I watched a man turn and move a 2 ton block by himself, using every leverage trick he knew.
And once he had everything set up to do it, it was a simple task.
He also lifted it up high enough to back his trailer under it to haul it away.
Again, doing all of this by himself, using nothing more than some 2x4 scraps and a few buckets filled with sand.

After watching him, and how he did it, I got to thinking, the ancients who built those huge buildings and had to lift 20 ton lentils into place, could very well have done it the same way he did, perhaps using stones instead of 2x4s which would crush under that much weight.
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yogi
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Re: Ordering Online

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A few times when I was putzing around in my one acre forest I moved logs and tree trunks by rolling them on the ground. Some of the paths would not allow for that so I did what Barney Flintstone would have done. I cut some trunks to the width of the path and then put the heavy logs on top of those to roll as if it were on wheels.

Over the years we have had furniture that needed to be disassembled to get it into place. I never had to remove a window or tear down a wall, however. LOL You are one amazing fellow to even think of doing such a thing, but I guess it's a lot easier to do when construction is in progress. It certainly will be a nightmare when that furniture has to be moved out. I only had one similar experience with a computer console. It was a flat pack do-it-yourself piece of furniture that I told you about many moons ago. It too could not fit through the doorway nor navigate through the hallways after it was built. When I redid that room I had to disassemble it and carry it out piece by piece.
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Kellemora
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Re: Ordering Online

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I've moved some heavy objects by using logs as rollers as well. Large concrete tanks, and a couple of steel ones too.

My two desks in my office cannot fit through even a 36 inch doorway assembled.
I guess it would be possible if you could lay them on their back, but if you try that, there is a good chance you would snap the top in half because of the cut-out for the glass. It's just easier to take it apart into four pieces or five if you count the small pieces, and reassemble them elsewhere.
My desk is more like a narrow filing cabinet on the right, and a super wide filing cabinet on the left, with a top spanning them.
Then the modesty panels and the 1/2 box that held the monitor under the glass in the top. Very nice desks when they were new.

My headboard to my bedroom set was supposed to be made in two pieces. It has a tower on each side of the bed that the headboard sits on top of the bottom part of the tower. It's slightly wider than a king size bed, and 18 inches deep, and 5 feet tall.
No way to go around a corner to get it out of a room and into a hallway.
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yogi
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Re: Ordering Online

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About the heaviest thing I roll around these days is the grass cutter; even that is 4WD. LOL

I have amassed a few office chairs, recliners, and sundry other no longer useful items since we moved here to O'Fallon. There is a "free" recycling center for these kind of things, but it is open only one Saturday a month. Back in Roselle there was also such a recycling depot but they also would come out to your home to pick up big items, such as refrigerators and overstuffed couches. I haven't seen any home service like that from the city here. They will provide me with a gondola for me to fill if I so desired that. Then, too, there is the junk pickup service we could pay to haul things away. The beauty of that service is that they would do all the moving from the basement to the truck. Anything other than that service would require me and my wife of many years to do the moving. I'm not sure how we will handle it yet. If I lived on a farm all I'd have to do is haul it all to an open spot and start a fire. :lol:
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Kellemora
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Re: Ordering Online

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Salvation army often comes in a truck with a couple of folks to carry things out, if it is something they might be able to rehome.

My wife finally made me get someone to do the mowing. he was supposed to be here today, but called and said he couldn't make it and would like to shift me from Tuesdays to Saturdays. That's fine with me. But he'll have a jungle by Saturday, hi hi.

Our Internet didn't come on until 11:17 am this morning, so I'm like three hours behind on everything now for the entire day.
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yogi
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Re: Ordering Online

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The first year or two here I hired somebody to do the lawn. I felt bad at first, but he did a decent job and relieved me of a lot of exercise. He worked for a company which had to take a cut and that brought the price to the upper end of my tolerance. I had to buy a mower eventually, so I bit the bullet and started doing things myself. Frequently I'll do it over two days. The front part one day and the back the next. The back has some steep grading and I wear my cleated baseball shoes to mow back there. The guy I hired had a riding mower and I never could understand why he didn't kill himself mowing that slope.

Yes, the Salvation Army will pick up if it's worth their effort. What I have is marginal because some of the chairs are broken. They can still be sat upon, but one is missing an arm. I suppose if I took off the remaining arm I can pass it off as a secretary's chair. LOL We found out that they want $325/wk for that gondola to sit in my driveway. We will be calling 1-800-JUNK to see what they have to say.

It's amazing how much we depend on the Internet. As it so happens, if our Internet goes out we still have the clever phones which operate on a different network. Yes, they are tethered to the router, but when the router is out we go to the mobile network. We have unlimited data on that network, but I never tested how much "unlimited" really means. Usually Charter keeps outages to under an hour, and we don't get too many of those.
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Kellemora
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Re: Ordering Online

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I have a Snapper riding mower, but what I cannot do is the trim work. Never could find anybody to do just that for me.
I made some changes in my yard so a push mower was no longer needed, so we gave that to a friend who had none.
But the hedges and things like that still need cut back and I can no longer do that.
And this year I don't think I could do the riding mower either without carrying an oxygen tank on it, hi hi.

When I first started gutting houses, I only had to pay 65 bucks for them to drop off a 60 cu yd dumpster and leave it for a week.
The big cost was picking it up and the dump fee. 85 to pick it up and like 125 dump fee. Still came out to 275 bucks.
Fast forward 1 year and it now cost 400 dollars for a 60 cu yd dumpster for only 3 days on site. If I needed it longer than 3 days, there was a 25 dollar per day charge.
Then I found another company who only had 35 cu yd dumpsters, and they only charged 100 bucks to drop it off at 8 am and pick it up at 6 pm. Only 75 bucks if they dropped off an empty when they picked up the full one. The only thing was, nothing could stick out the top, which was no problem for me. I had a deal with them anyhow. 3 days with daily pick-up for 250 bucks, and that included the dump fees too.
On or about my third time of using them, I learned they didn't dump at a public dump. They had their own dump, but they went through construction debris and sorted out some things they could resell, usually as fuel for a local company who heated their office building with almost anything burnable, hi hi. I guess this was my first encounter with a trash hauler who tried to recycle what he could. Wires, pipes, metal, etc. and old drywall and plaster they sold to farmers to spread on their fields after they ground it up into almost a granular powder.

90% of what I do during the day is done on-line. I have a few things I do that is done locally in-house, but even then, it sometimes requires hopping on the Internet to download or upload what I was working on.
Amazing how things have changed since the age of computers, and then the age of the Internet!
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yogi
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Re: Ordering Online

Post by yogi »

There must be a lot of profit in processing junk. Up by Chicago there were people who would come by twice a week to pick up anything you left by the curb. These were independent people and not the city. The city only took what you put inside their provided trash bins. I put old televisions, mattresses, furniture, and scraps of metal (such as gutters and down spouts) out by the curb on Tuesday afternoon. By Wednesday morning they were all gone. The question I had was what do these guys do with all this junk they are picking up for free? My guess is that they did not take anything that could not be recycled, repurposed, or sold for a profit. I can't imagine making a living doing that sort of thing, but there was certainly no shortage of people in that business.

It's possible something like that exists here in O'Fallon, but anybody in my subdivision who leaves junk by the curb will be unceremoniously shot at sunrise. The HOA HAS RULES about that kind of thing. You can't even leave your trash bin out over night for pickup in the morning. I never wanted to do that, but several of my neighbors do it in violation of the covenant. Fortunately for them, that clause is not enforced very well, but my point of grievance is that they made such a stupid rule to begin with. So, any wealthy junk collectors are not allowed in my neighborhood.
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Kellemora
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Re: Ordering Online

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We have a guy in a pick-up truck who drives through our subdivision the night before the trash pickup.
Here, we have to put our trash bin out the night before, even if they don't pick up until around 4 pm the next day.
They only pick up what is in the bin, but since we know about the guy in the pick-up truck, we will lean things against the edge of the fence for him.
He was happy as a lark the day I caught him and had him back up the driveway to load up.
I had the frame for the garage door, the entire axle housing from under my wife's Jimmy which I had replaced, plus all the large welded wire fabric squares I bought to do my driveway. He also got two old lawn mowers, and several old cast iron items, mainly old pipe and a few cracked pots.
He normally takes everything straight to the recycling centers we have here, but when I told him the rear end was OK, we only thought it was bad, but it turned out it wasn't. So I don't know if he did something different with it or not.
I always have to tell him, NO you cannot have our bins of aluminum cans, we take those ourselves, my frau gets the money.
But I was giving him other aluminum things I had here, like old screen doors, gutters and downspouts.
He made a big haul after the hailstorm, enough he could afford to buy a new truck anyhow.
Steel doesn't pay that much, but I guess if you find as much as he does, it pays enough for him to do it.
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yogi
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Re: Ordering Online

Post by yogi »

Yes, the junk collectors up north came by the day before the city would collect the trash. I can't believe there would be a lot of payout for miscellaneous scrap metal, but there were at least two guys in the old neighborhood who came by for all the 25 years I lived there. I'm sure it wasn't the same two all that time, but there never seemed to be a week that they did not come by. And that includes months with snow on the ground.

My wife's brother-in-law has an apartment building that he owns and maintains. His favorite hobby is to cruise around like the junk collectors I mentioned and find stuff that is still usable or repairable, like old wash machines. He would fix them up and use them in his apartment building. Apparently he had a lot of things in his basement that he was working on because his wife would complain all the time about the junk he brought home. He was not averse to buying new things for his own use, but he felt that there was a lot of freebies out there which are still usable. He's retired now and doesn't go on scavenger hunts anymore.
Last edited by yogi on 16 Apr 2021, 16:43, edited 1 time in total.
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Kellemora
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Re: Ordering Online

Post by Kellemora »

It is not uncommon to see things sitting by the road for a couple of weeks around here, because the metal gleaners don't want it.
I saw a nice bookshelf I would have liked to nab, but with my condition I couldn't lift it into my Blazer myself. It was gone the next day when I drove by. So somebody got it ahead of the rain.

I owned the Holmes Avenue apartments for a few years, and when something broke, I always bought new, usually Roper brand.
We had an appliance dealer who stocked the bottom end line of a lot of things for those who were renovating houses or owned apartments. His price was always fair as could be, and ironically, that Roper brand stuff held up well and for many years too.

I charged 15 bucks a month extra if they wanted a stove, but the fridge was figured into the price at around 10 bucks a month.
When a tenant moved out, and I stopped in to inspect the place, if the stove looked grungy, I told them they can have the stove and fridge. If they were there for three years, I would sometimes, if they were neat about everything, would stop charging them for the stove and tell them it was now theirs. None of the apartments had dishwashers, and I didn't provide hookups for a washer dryer since there was a laundromat right next door. I did have a storage area where a tenant could install a washer dryer if they really wanted to, but the area was open, so most didn't. I think maybe two older folks did have a small washer/dryer combo that actually fit into their storage closet. They would roll it out and over to the connections area, then roll it back when done.
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