How To Clear Snow in Kentucky

The is the core forum of BFC. It's all about informal and random talk on any topic.
Forum rules
Post a new topic to begin a chat.
Any topic is acceptable, and topic drift is permissible.
User avatar
Kellemora
Posts: 4791
Joined: 16 Feb 2015, 17:54

Re: How To Clear Snow in Kentucky

Post by Kellemora »

Well, the problem does only happen rarely, and it is not always the same thing.
It used to be I would end up somewhere, but could get back and my work was still here.
But the past few times it has dumped me back to the login screen, and using the back button of the browser doesn't take me back to where I was before. In fact, hitting the back button takes me back to the log-in screen again.
I've even tried holding down the back button to get the history and go back that way, but it still only gives me the log-in screen, which is something it shouldn't be doing, at least I don't think it should do that.
But I guess when you get logged out, you are logged out down through the history too.

I was doing like you said for a while, using notepad, and then pasting it back.
But I really never know when I start if I'm going to get WINDY or not, hi hi.

User avatar
yogi
Posts: 7135
Joined: 14 Feb 2015, 21:49

Re: How To Clear Snow in Kentucky

Post by yogi »

I have noted that the browser will cache the contents of this editing box so that flipping back in history and coming back to continue the edit is very possible. If you log out before the editing box content is posted, then the content is deleted, or more correctly, is never cached. This has to do with session ID's. Once you log out of the site, your session ID is deleted. Signing in gives you a new ID and that session is not considered to be the same as the one you logged out of previously; thus no history for the newly created session. I think that explains why you can't retrieve a lost session from history, but it does not explain why you get kicked out in the first place.

User avatar
Kellemora
Posts: 4791
Joined: 16 Feb 2015, 17:54

Re: How To Clear Snow in Kentucky

Post by Kellemora »

I guess we'll never know what causes it. I can't duplicate it using the keyboard.

On another note:
I had sent back the first mouse I bought because it was dead.
The new one, a different more expensive model came yesterday.
It is HORRIBLE! Made by Sanwa in China of course, hi hi.
It looks pretty, and it works ONLY on USB, not if you use a PS2 Adapter with it though.
I will be sending it back for MANY Reasons.
I'm a male with small cadet hands, and this thing was designed for someone with 6 digits, 5 fingers and a thumb.
The left and right click buttons with the wheel in the center are so close together, you have to move your left finger off the button to use the scroll wheel, and when you do, the super touchy extra buttons get touched and boom you are gone from the page.
Where the thumball is, they have a narrow ledge, so sharp it has cut my thumb twice yesterday and once today already.
The right click button was so sensitive, I had to put a piece of foam rubber under it to keep it from triggering.
While the left click button takes a long travel to click and it is sorta sideways so your finger slides into those other buttons to the left of it.
Now I used my Logitech meeces all day every day and never got a sweaty palm. This thing my palm sweats in under five minutes.

I think I'll have to buy the Logitech Wireless mouse, since it is shaped like their original mice I loved so well.
But I'll bet you dollars to donuts that it too will be USB only and not work with a PS2 adapter.
WHY do I need to use a PS2 adapter?
Because the mouse ports in both of my KVM switches were made for PS2 meeces.
I did retire my old PS2 KVM because its output connections were also PS2. I took it to the house to use on my wife's computer, but when she went with wireless keyboard and mouse, and her new computer too did not have PS2 ports.
My 4-port KVM has PS2 input for the mouse and keyboard, but has VGA and USB for the output. It has 3 USB plugs on the front and if I set those ports to follow which computer I'm on, I can use a USB only mouse, including wireless meeces.

I did find some old Logitech Track Man Wheel meeces USED for sale on eBay, but they are asking ridiculous prices for them. They say the wireless Logitech thumball mouse battery lasts for over a year, which is good, and it now uses a laser instead of optical ball reader. The only problem with wireless is they have connection problems sometimes, meaning they will skip when they shouldn't skip.

User avatar
yogi
Posts: 7135
Joined: 14 Feb 2015, 21:49

Re: How To Clear Snow in Kentucky

Post by yogi »

I'd like to say I never had your kind of problems with the mouses I've used, but I don't want to tell you any lies. I've used many of the Logitech ones, Microsoft, and a few off the wall brands. None of those standard mouses performed to my utmost satisfaction. Although, I must say some were better than others. A few years ago I decided to switch to what is called gaming computers and accessories. I don't claim to be a gamer but I am very interested in high performance and quality. All of that is implied when you ratchet up to gaming equipment. Unfortunately, not all gaming equipment lives up to the standards. Plus they typically have features I don't use, such as extra buttons and macro programability, but that excess capacity is acceptable if I can get good response in the standard mode. I'm currently using Steele Series keyboard and mouse, and there are some things lacking. The keyboard does not have MX switches, but the touch sensitivity can be programed for each individual key. I love this feature but it's not the true MX switch feel. To date the mouse switches have held up as they were from day #1. This is very unusual in my experiences given that most mouse switches lose their detents after extended use. Steele Series claims millions of cycles and so far they are holding up. The software provided to program the keyboard and mouse needs some improvement, but that's not why I like this equipment. I'd recommend this brand to you but it's terribly expensive and I know you are hard on your equipment. It might not be worth it.

I more or less abandoned PS2 when the industry changed its standards. There happens to be a PS2 connector on my ASUS motherboard, but all my peripherals use USB3. The fact that you need PS2 connectors for your KVM is practical in your situation, but, alas, it's not the way things are done these days. I don't know what to suggest in that case.

Very little electronics is not made in China these days, and I've never found that to be an issue. The reason why is that the American company which outsources their manufacturing sets the quality standards. If you get crap from them the company who hired them is allowing that to happen. I haven't had reason to return much merchandise, but the best scenario was when I complained to the company's marketing manager and not to their tech support people. Not only did I get two (2) brand new devices, but also a tee shirt, and a new release of a game on DVD. Plus he called me to make sure I was happy and being treated properly. I loved it but that does not mitigate the crap they sent me in the first place and the fact that their web site sucks. LOL

User avatar
Kellemora
Posts: 4791
Joined: 16 Feb 2015, 17:54

Re: How To Clear Snow in Kentucky

Post by Kellemora »

Almost all of the video games I worked on used Cherry brand or Omron switches because they are almost impossible to wear out. I've gone through six Logitech TrackMan Wheel meeces and every one had the left click switch start double-clicking.
I tried taking a couple of old ones apart to repair, like cob the right-click switch, but they are a different style. Neither are very easily replaceable. Considering I probably click the left mouse button over a 1000 times a day, I don't doubt I hit 2-million clicks in a couple of years. They have always been good reliable meeces for me!

My KVM switch has USB ports on the front that make these PS2 incompatible meeces work. The KVM can be set to bring the USB ports along with me to whichever computer I switch too. Which makes the one I just left make a Kerplunk sound as if the mouse was unplugged, hi hi. Doesn't do that on the PS2 ports. Although all of my Logitech mice have been USB, they worked fine with the PS2 adapter plug. But I sorta doubt their new wireless one will. I hate to think of what it will cost to replace my perfectly working KVM switch.
The downside of causing the USB ports to move with me to whatever computer I'm on, is I normally run my backups and get them started on two other machines, then come back to my machine. This means I cannot run backup if I have other work to do. Heck, I may not be able to run backups at all if it thinks its mouse is unplugged.
I have some old regular PS2 meeces laying around here, and I do know I can run more than one mouse at a time on a computer, been doing that for years, hi hi.
I took one old mouse and screwed it down to a wooden board I had on the floor, and glued a rubber ball on top of the left click button. That way I could just tap my foot to do the left mouse click while I was using both of my hands, one to hold down the CTRL key, and the other to use the mouse scroll wheel to move down a line or two that I needed to click on.
I may have to go down a row of 150 lines clicking on each one only once, which in turn opens a tab so the process could load. I used to only do 25 lines at a time, then clear the tabs, then do another 25, but found I can now do 50 at a time before I have to clear the tabs. I usually get a two or three minutes break after I start 50 tabs, waiting for them to load. That's all I have to do is wait for them to load. Then after I do 150 of them, go store the file their program saved the data to.

Ironically, I found the mouse I wanted on Amazon at the original price, sold by Amazon. But neither their add to cart button or buy now button added it to the cart. So I decided to go to another company.
If I could have ordered it from Amazon, it wouldn't be here until February 12th give or take, since it was out of stock.
The company I did order from had them in stock, with free 3 to 5 day shipping, and they were 20 bucks cheaper than Amazon's normal price.
Seems every time I find a product on Amazon, from Amazon, not a vendor, and find the same thing with a cheaper price by hunting around further, it is either out of stock with no buttons, or out of stock with an expected ship date and the buttons don''t work.

User avatar
yogi
Posts: 7135
Joined: 14 Feb 2015, 21:49

Re: How To Clear Snow in Kentucky

Post by yogi »

it's not only Amazon that has convoluted order entry web pages. I have several favorites I shop from and they all do pretty much what you describe. Google search takes me right to the item of interest, but adding it to the cart may or many not work. In most of those cases there is a small note somewhere saying they can't be ordered online, or they are out of stock, or I can put my name on a notification list, or in some cases there is no explanation at all. The ones that really bug me are those that let you order the item and then notify you they can't ship it for some reason or another. I always cancel those type of bait and switch transactions.

Some of my online shops have changed their order entry web pages so that it is not necessary to enter my address completely. As I type in my delivery address a drop down menu appears suggesting exact addresses. By the time I get 7-8 characters into the address box, they suggest my exact home address. Not only do I not have to enter all those details manually, I don't have to save my personal information on their web site for some hacker to compromise.

You are doing some fascinating things with computers, and a KVM box seems appropriate for your situation. I'd try to simplify it all on one or two computers using, perhaps, virtual machines to simulate all the extra hardware you are employing. Doing it that way would require buying a lot of expensive memory and monitors, not to mention a super charged processor or two. I didn't realize Linux sent out the "kerplunk" sound effect when you add or subtract a USB device; I thought that was only a Windows innovation. Linux does flash a notification on the screen to let you know some external device was added to the configuration. Windows does too, most of the time.

User avatar
Kellemora
Posts: 4791
Joined: 16 Feb 2015, 17:54

Re: How To Clear Snow in Kentucky

Post by Kellemora »

I use a mineral type of product in my formula, and I never had trouble buying it from a chemical supply house, until 2019.
I went through the process of duplicating my previous order, so they already had all the info.
Got a message back saying they could not sell to me because I was not a licensed laboratory.
I sent them a message back saying you have been sending me the same order now for over 18 years.
They said new laws prevent them from selling except to licensed laboratories.
And it has been banned for use in fish farms. Which I understand completely.
I finally found a company that did sell to me in a larger bulk size, and it turned out the price was less.
Ironically, when it came, it originated from the company who would no longer sell to me, hi hi.
Same bottle, same label, only their larger size bottle.
I use so little I will die before I use up that larger amount.
Oh, and it cost less than the smaller size too! So I don't know how they reseller makes a profit.

Hmm, now that you mention it, just perhaps it is the Windows XP machine doing the Kerplunk Sound.
I did some window shopping for KVM switches, and one like mine, that only cost me like 40 bucks, was now discontinued, but I saw it was priced at 149.95 right before it was discontinued.
Of all the new ones, not a one had all the features this one has, but the closest one to it was around 500 bucks.
Some were as high as 900 bucks and a few over 1 or 2 thousand dollars, for a KVM, that's crazy.
There were also a lot of cheap one's too, but they had no features to them, some didn't even let you know what computer you are on. Just a plain small box with the connectors all around on it like an octopus.

On the front of my 4-port KVM, there are 10 LED lights. The power LED light is a very tiny unobtrusive green dot. All the other LED lights are large, about 1/8th inch in diameter. One of the green LEDs shows whether the USB ports are in Auto-Scan mode. Besides controlling the KVM switch from the keyboard using the Scroll Lock button. There are 4 buttons on the front of the switch with two LED lights above each switch vertically, The red one lets you know which computer you are on, and the green one below it lets you know which computer the USB ports are connected to.
You can switch computers by pressing one of the buttons once. Press it twice for the USB port to jump to that computer, or press and hold the button for the Auto-Scan mode to turn on. In auto-scan the USB ports will follow to the computer you move to. There are three available USB ports on the front. There are no buttons on the top or sides.
All the physical connections are made on the back.
Back when I bought it, I looked at many different KVM switches and this one had all the features I wanted. None of the others even came close, and as I said, I got a good deal on this one at the time I bought it too.
It has worked faithfully for many years now too!

Would you believe, one of the reasons I was using separate computers, I learned I can't do that with places like Farcebook anymore. If I'm logged into Farcebook on one computer, it would never let me log into Farcebook from the same computer using a different tab, so I used two different computers. Now they have a limit of two log-ins from the same cable line. So my wife has one log-in and I have another. If I try a third, it jumps directly to my own account that is logged in. What this means is, I cannot use one of my other accounts to meet myself to exchange some things between us in real time like before. Not that I really need to do that anymore anyhow, hi hi.

The times I tried using Virtual Box, I've had problems with the programs working right.
I also managed to trash an external drive I was using to save files on by trying to link it to the OS I was running in VB, and also linking it to my other OS I could switch to. I figured that would be the easiest way to share files. It could have been user error that messed it up, so thankfully I had a backup of everything on that drive. So I just reformatted it and copied all the files back to it, which took over 2 hours of tying up my computer to do, hi hi.

Speaking of multiple computers. I got to talk to the IT guy who comes around to Debi's workplace about once a week or more often to do some updates on their computers, and cash register systems.
He told me he uses a server computer at his house for all of his families files.
But, they are not in folders the way I use folders for stuff. Everything is just loaded into a main single folder, and you do a quick search for something to fetch it. But you don't have to search the entire database if you know it was something that belongs to you, you just search with your name first, then the filename or a good guess. If that don't bring it up, then you search for a line in the text which does take a bit longer. He said you can also search by date, just a year, or a month is fine too. If you want to make a copy of all of your own files, it lets you do that too.
I don't think I want to get that complicated with my stuff though. I have it all organized on an NTFS drive, so after I kick the bucket, everything will be easy to find using a Windows computer.

User avatar
yogi
Posts: 7135
Joined: 14 Feb 2015, 21:49

Re: How To Clear Snow in Kentucky

Post by yogi »

There are many ways to set up a file server. Your description of the tech at Walgreens reminds me of what I don't like about most Linux distributions. Any file can be found in Linux if you do a search for it. The problem there is that you need to know the name of the file. GUI formats such as in file managers might not be the most efficient way to serve a lot of data, but it makes sense to me and I don't have to waste time searching for things I don't know the name of. My NAS is in effect a server. That's divided up into six or seven volumes and they are all shared with Windows. Thus all my data is lumped into one of seven categories. There are times when I forget which category a file would reside in but even that is better than looking for something in a haystack I can't name.

Virtual boxes these days have the ability to use an external block of memory to share data. In my case it is a simple folder on my Windows desktop; the same Windows that hosts the virtual boxes but it doesn't have to be that way. The path must be specified in the settings of the VB and then the target must be mounted. After doing that, it appears as another drive that is mounted and can swap files like gangbusters. External hard drives and DVD's and literally any USB device can be attached to the virtual box easily through the device menu built into the software. I do THAT trick to make all my Linux On A stick installs. The iso is mounted as a hard drive and the USB is attached to the box. There is no OS other than the iso. Thus Linux installs itself to the USB stick from the live CD using a box that is virtually empty. LOL

Your KVM is a rare bird. I'm not surprised you cannot find it for $40 anywhere in 2021, or find it at all. Most of that kind of switching is only found in network administration roles and I can't believe there would be a big demand for it. You are right about many of the websites changing their login policies. Too many freaking bots out there more or less forced them to take that stance.

User avatar
Kellemora
Posts: 4791
Joined: 16 Feb 2015, 17:54

Re: How To Clear Snow in Kentucky

Post by Kellemora »

Look how fast a search engine brings up the data for what you are looking for. 100,000 hits in 3 microseconds.
And sorts them to relevancy and of course by whose paying for ads to come up too, hi hi.
All I can say is they must have massive files of Keywords that sort things for them somehow.

I know you've done a lot of interesting things using USB sticks and VBs.
I'm actually trying to simplify as many things as I can, so my wife, brother, and son, can find things after I'm gone easily.

They must not be too rare, I just went looking again at 4, 8, and 16 port KVM switches. There are hundreds of styles to choose from too.
But not a single one of them have the features my little KVM switch has.
Most are just KVM to either HDMI, VGA, DVI, and some even use CAT6 cables for long runs, such as server arrays.
I would say I must have been really lucky back when I went to buy my second KVM to find this gem so easily, and priced right too.

Well, I finally found one very similar to mine. Except this one has the mouse and keyboard ports in the front instead of on the back. 125 bucks!
http://www.audiogurus.com/trulink-reg-4 ... witch.html
I bookmarked it in case I need one fairly soon, hi hi.

User avatar
yogi
Posts: 7135
Joined: 14 Feb 2015, 21:49

Re: How To Clear Snow in Kentucky

Post by yogi »

I like the switch you linked to in every respect but one. The USB port is not USB3.

To be honest I have no idea what is cutting edge in server control rooms these days. Back when I had access to them that KVM box would come in handy for a rack full of servers. I suspect there are better ways to do things in 2021. Home users, such as yourself, have to be a rare breed if only for the fact that not many people have more than one computer with plugin input devices.

The search engine stats you quote look like something from Google or one of its clones. Those folks write their own operating systems and network controllers. They are optimized for the task at hand. The structure of the database is a military grade top secret configuration. LOL I can assure you it's not SQL driven and the indexing of records has to be out of this world. The speed isn't what impresses me as much as the ability of search engines to narrow down things so quickly. Imagine having everything there is to know stored on your computer farm. How would you go about organizing that information for quick retrieval? It is mind boggling.

I don't know exactly what you are trying to preserve or how informed your intended audience might be. But, I can see creating a bunch of memory sticks with all the information you want to pass on. All the family need do is plug the memory into their computer's USB port and voila. Linux takes them there. Of course, those folks who have devices sans USB ports are SOL. It used to be that your BIOS had to be set up to boot from USB but my tower with Windows 7 has no such setting and will boot from those Linux On A Sick's unassisted. Certainly not everybody has a computer configuration such as mine so that there could be some complications booting into a stick memory. You seem to have the right idea. Just format the sticks NT and put all the files you want preserved in that. Should work in any Windows computer.

User avatar
Kellemora
Posts: 4791
Joined: 16 Feb 2015, 17:54

Re: How To Clear Snow in Kentucky

Post by Kellemora »

I'm sure someone makes one with USB3 ports on them, I was surprised to see so many.
Or another way is to just use a USB3 Hub.
My first KVM did not have any USB ports on it at all, it was strictly VGA PS2 and nothing else, hi hi.
I just happen to LOVE the one I have, because I can look at it and see what computer I'm on, and if the USB is stationary or following which computer I'm on.

Most of the server rooms I've been in has a built in desk at the end of each row of servers, with a monitor and keyboard, so they can pull up any of the computers in that bank of servers.
One time I was in one and one of the monitors on the end started flashing red, and a guy hustled over there real quick.
Apparently one of the computer boards went bad and their programming notified them of it.
But it still took him a while of going through several before he found which cabinet and which board it was.
I think in this case, the board wasn't bad, just lost a connection, because they opened the case, did something, came back and all was working again.

I know Google uses their own programming, and probably all the other big places too.

Well, the things I need the family to have access to, are over 100 years of images, all neatly filed by who is in those images, many by their locations, etc. Also, the genealogy image files, also linked to each person.
Then there are thousands of camera shots of things, most are not sorted out that well yet either.
Many won't be interested in a lot of them either, so I only file certain ones in specific folders, leaving the original where it came from too.
All of my accounting records for all of my businesses from 1972 forward are all in digital format, and other files show what file boxes the original paper files are in should they be needed.
All of the birth, marriage, and death certificates for close to 30,000 people are in my files also.
And then there are tons of other things they may or may not care about.
USB sticks would be great, except. I bought four 32 gig USB sticks to send things to my son on.
I used all four and did not have even 1/10th of the things he asked for.
He also does not have the storage capability I have either.
What I did to is take a 250 gig IDE drive and an IDE to USB adapter and loaded up some files and sent to him.
Told him to go out and buy a 2 terrabyte external drive and copy those files to it, because the IDE drive is so old.
He never did that, so I never got the drive back to send him more stuff on.

I'm a pack-rat and never delete anything. So I have program files for DOS, Win 3.0, Win 3.11, hi hi, which nobody would ever want for anything. Although that being said, I did have a friend contact me once to see if I had a DLL file of a certain name so he could get an old game working. I looked in my saved DLL file list and had three like he wanted, each from different eras, hi hi.

User avatar
yogi
Posts: 7135
Joined: 14 Feb 2015, 21:49

Re: How To Clear Snow in Kentucky

Post by yogi »

While I talked about USB memory sticks, there are other types of memory devices that would be suitable for large amounts of data, i.e., portable SSD memory and external solid state drives. These would probably be more durable and faster than memory sticks, but they are costly by comparison. The memory and external drives would work well on any Windows computer of recent vintage. Sorting things out, on the other hand, could be a task for a super computer, preferably a quantum computer. I'm not sure that even Google's database managers can help you out there. :lol:

I'm not sure there is a lot of variation in the technology for server management. Most of it is centralized but if it's large enough it can be distributed. I would guess somebody like Amazon has hundreds if not thousands of command and control centers for it's servers . Failure detection and error correction can be automated, but as you noted it takes some physical activity to plug a cable back into a loose connector. Until the nature of servers changes, I'm guessing servicing them will always be the same.

I saw an ad today from Lenovo regarding some new VR glasses they were offering for enterprises. These glasses can project up to five monitors into your virtual field of vision. The ad talked about the glasses but I was asking myself all along how these virtual monitors are actually connected to the various computers. Whatever the answer is, it has to be expensive. LOL

User avatar
Kellemora
Posts: 4791
Joined: 16 Feb 2015, 17:54

Re: How To Clear Snow in Kentucky

Post by Kellemora »

IF I only had MONEY, hi hi...

Back in the Apple II and II+ days, we had to always be taking the cards out of their slots and using a soft eraser on them for them to maintain contact. Then later on, they came out with gold plated contacts on the newer computers and ended the problem.

I talked to a guy not to long who bought a pair of those, they were big and heavy and about six inches from face to end of the case, so one tended to lean forward from the weight.
But he could divide the screen up inside like you would do when tiling images on your computer, but keep one larger screen in the middle. He tried it that way a few times, then went back only using it for his game, said it gave him a whopper of a headache and caused eye strain big time.

User avatar
yogi
Posts: 7135
Joined: 14 Feb 2015, 21:49

Re: How To Clear Snow in Kentucky

Post by yogi »

The VR goggles you describe sound like those from Oculus. The ones Lenovo were selling looked more like those thick lens glasses us old guys tend to wear when we get nearsighted. I'm reading more and more about how VR is being implemented for enterprise use. Microsoft is going hog wild in that regard. All I've ever seen previously are those goggles gamers use. As they become more prolific I am certain there will be design improvements. Google Lens started out looking like an ordinary pair of sun glasses but they weren't doing VR at the time. The software for those glasses is being licensed to several companies today but Google dropped the glasses from their product line.

User avatar
Kellemora
Posts: 4791
Joined: 16 Feb 2015, 17:54

Re: How To Clear Snow in Kentucky

Post by Kellemora »

My brother got out of the game vending business about the time VR stuff was coming on the scene.
He did have a couple of games where you wore gloves which sensed your movements, and kids destroyed them fairly fast.

My 1955 Ford Custom, had a speedometer who's pointer would reflect up on your windshield, if you turned the light on to make it do that. I thought it was annoying myself!
One of Debi's cousins just bought a new car, and some of the instrument panel items are displayed on the windshield. They thought that was great, until they drove it at night and couldn't find a way to turn it off or down. They finally did the next day, but it was not obvious how to do that. All the buttons on the cars these days are like everything else new, each button may have several functions. Also a reason I never turn on my car radio. Takes me ten minutes to figure out how to turn it back off each time, hi hi.

User avatar
yogi
Posts: 7135
Joined: 14 Feb 2015, 21:49

Re: How To Clear Snow in Kentucky

Post by yogi »

There is an amazing assortment of equipment that you can get on newer cars, most of which would take some class time to learn how they work. One gadget is a parking assist feature which gives feedback when you are trying to park your car. Some cars will actually parallel park themselves. Then there is a blind spot viewer which I've never seen or used. I simply adjust the regular mirrors on the Saturn so that I can see what they call a blind spot. This requires moving your head toward the mirror because it can't be seen from the normal driving position. Then the navigation system is nothing less than a computer display. It's illegal to have a television up front with the pilot but these goofy information panels require taking your eyes off the road to read them. Then, too, there is night vision. All of these add-ons would not be necessary if the car was self-driven, which is what I suppose it's all leading up to.

And, there are the VR experiences that simulate driving to various places in the world to see the sights. That has got to be interesting.

User avatar
Kellemora
Posts: 4791
Joined: 16 Feb 2015, 17:54

Re: How To Clear Snow in Kentucky

Post by Kellemora »

The more stuff they put into cars, the more they will cost to keep fixed, hi hi.
All of my vehicles, besides the main outside mirrors on both sides, I also had a button mirror and a wedge mirror on each. This eliminated all blind spots for me. Even the rear view mirror inside the car has a separate horizontal rectangular mirror above the OEM mirror. This high mirror is tilted more downward so you can see the ground behind the car a little better. Great for backing up to loading docks, hi hi.

Not one of my brothers machines, but an entertainment center had a video simulator you climb into. Sit down on the seat from the side, then turn to the front and the seat moved up about 3 feet. In the front was an LCD screen, and to the left and right were LCD screens set at about 30 degrees. It was designed like the cockpit of a jet airplane.
But you could also select cross country on the ground, in either a RV or a Jeep. The RV was limited to roads, but the Jeep was for trails. I did all of them on different visits to the place.
I was there one time when the electric went out, and the seat I was in automatically slid backwards and turned so I could get out. I thought that was an amazing feature of the device too.
The LCD screens had thick glass or plastic over them to keep the kids from destroying them.
The controls for airplane used the foot pedals like a regular airplane would, and the steering wheel pulled back and forward. In RV mode, the steering wheel could be adjusted but did not make a difference on anything else. It was an automatic transmission so you only used the brake and gas pedal. In jeep mode, the left pedal was the clutch, and the airplane throttle was the gearshift. So whoever designed this thing though of everything to make it seem real.
You didn't know you were in a stationary object, and yes you could crash, or tip over, hi hi.

User avatar
yogi
Posts: 7135
Joined: 14 Feb 2015, 21:49

Re: How To Clear Snow in Kentucky

Post by yogi »

I'm pretty sure this happened at Disney World, but it could have been somewhere else. I'd guess I read about it some twenty years ago. You enter a small theater and sit in what was almost normal theater seats. The movie screen was pretty much wrap around - they had a name for that but I don't recall what it was. There were several different shows but the hallmark was a roller coaster ride. The seats vibrated and leaned in various directions in sync with what was going on on the projection screen. The Dolby sound added to the effect. This was all going on before Virtual Reality became a buzz word. I think this is the article where I read about virtual travels to famous sights. The Eiffel Tower and the Pyramids come to mind as destinations. It was an amazing theater to be sure.

Sometimes I wonder if game and arcade developers actually use what they create. LOL It seems as if the simulator you describe was well thought out and engineered. The automatic escape on power fail is absolutely brilliant. I need something like that to get me away from this computer once in a while.

User avatar
Kellemora
Posts: 4791
Joined: 16 Feb 2015, 17:54

Re: How To Clear Snow in Kentucky

Post by Kellemora »

I think most of the major amusement places had something like you described.
I know the Kraft Land Exhibit at EPCOT did, I only got to go on it when I was there in later years to visit as a customer.
I was there working before it was built. It was a swamp at the time, complete with alligators. I lived in a little Hupmobile trailer with a 2 foot high chain link fence around it to keep the gaters from eating the tires.
It was a 100 foot dash to make it from my trailer to the entrance gate, and you had to watch to make sure no gaters were within about 50 to 75 feet of you, else you couldn't outrun them, hi hi.
If you did see one though, you just called the guardhouse, and they would shoot them with a tranquilizer gun, then haul them off somewhere else. Probably to another swamp in the area. But they kept coming back to their old stomping grounds almost the whole time I was there.
One they had the Endotherm greenhouse built, then my work really got hard installing all the hydroponic equipment.
Then after the advertising folks designed the fancy stuff that didn't work, they called me back in to figure out ways to make it work, even if only for show purposes.

Some of the arcade game makers put a lot of thought and engineering into the games or equipment they sold.
Other companies, not so much, they relied on their name, and fairly generic boxes to house there games.
In a way, that was good, because they were easy to repair and restore, or even put newer games in them.

User avatar
yogi
Posts: 7135
Joined: 14 Feb 2015, 21:49

Re: How To Clear Snow in Kentucky

Post by yogi »

Amazing as it seems, I've never set foot inside a themed amusement park. When I was 16 a neighbor and I traveled down rt66 to Los Angeles. We talked about going to Disneyland with the relatives he was visiting out there. That plan was changed - probably because it was an expensive adventure - and we went to Knotts Berry Farm instead. I was not impressed. LOL The Six Flags franchise had a park not too far from where I worked. My kids had season's passes, but I never even got to the parking lot. Thus, whatever was the latest and greatest form of amusements escaped my viewing.

I can't imagine working side by side with alligators, but it's not that unusual in Florida. I know somebody who runs a horse ranch in the middle of Florida and they have a pond with an old gator in it. They are everywhere except in the big cities, so it seems.

I worked with development engineers almost my entire career at Motorola. About the only people I know of who are more arrogant are the people working in Information Technology. Yes, I worked in that group and became popular because I made a deliberate effort not to appear arrogant. I had my share of dumb blonds asking where the "Any Key" is located but I always did my best to explain the facts of life to them in terms they would understand. The problem is that both IT and Dev Engineers are pretty smart people with giant creative minds. Whatever they produce is built to their level of understanding, however, and the end user is often considered lacking in enough intelligence to understand what is going on. All the braniacs I met worked for Motorola which was kind of an insulation for their arrogance. When your own business depends on your personal performance, then, and only then, does some consideration for the repercussions of your work become a consideration.

Post Reply