Silent letters

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yogi
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Joined: 14 Feb 2015, 21:49

Silent letters

Post by yogi »

In the word "SCENT" is the 's' or the 'c' silent ?

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Kellemora
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Joined: 16 Feb 2015, 17:54

Re: Silent letters

Post by Kellemora »

And Scissors, and, and, and.

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yogi
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Re: Silent letters

Post by yogi »

That was my thought as well. There is no answer. :realsad:

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Kellemora
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Re: Silent letters

Post by Kellemora »

My late wife pronounces scissors as skizers, hi hi.

The real question is, is the C really silent or not?

Do you say Sent, Cent, and Scent in exactly the same way?

We may think we do, but if you unconsciously record your own voice and then play it back with a sine wave, you'll see we don't pronounce them exactly the same way.

On a totally different note and item, I won a bet with guy who had been driving motorcycles for over 30 years.
It could be because he really never noticed or wasn't thinking about it properly when he answered.
I simply asked, when making a corner on your bike, whether you are touching the handlebars or not, and perhaps you lean into the curve to get it to go that direction. Here is my question. Do you initially turn the wheel to the left to make a right turn? His first response was NO, which meant I won the bet! Then he thought about it for a second longer and decided to pay me my dollar bet, hi hi.
I honestly never expected someone who rode a bike most of his life to get the answer wrong, hi hi.

My only point in bringing that up at all is, folks do a lot of things unconsciously so often it becomes natural to them and they no longer think about it that way. Sorta like how you pronounce words.
If you know someone with a recording studio, don't ever take a bet that you pronounce Sent, Cent, and Scent the same way, because they will win every time, and you can see it plain as day on the oscilloscope patterns.
Trouble is, if you are conscious of what you are doing, you may mess up and make them sound the same.
But what they may do is have you read a paragraph from a script, and make a tape of it first.
Then they will ask if you say Sent, Cent, and Scent the same way.
You'll see in casual practice you don't say them the same way.

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yogi
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Re: Silent letters

Post by yogi »

Being a microphone test technician for a dozen or two years gave me many opportunities to view voice patterns as represented by various types of instruments. I must confess, however, we never checked out how people used or abused the language. You could be right about the pronunciation differences between sent, scent, and sent, but it's all psychological. We got into things such as psycho-acoustics where light, humidity, and temperature, and a few other things in a given environment made things sound different. So, I can assure you that those three versions of the word would also be perceived differently depending on the lighting, temperature, and humidity of the field in which you heard them. What you are pointing out is possibly true from a technical point of view. The voice envelopes may be different, but the perception on the receiving end is not. Regardless of what the eardrum records, the brain makes all three sound the same. They are homonyms. If all you have to go by is what you hear, you cannot distinguish which of the three versions is being pronounced unless the words are put into the context of a sentence. The written version of those words has no sound, thus the spelling must convey the intended meaning. I would make the conjecture that that is the only reason for the various spellings of words that sound alike.

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Kellemora
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Re: Silent letters

Post by Kellemora »

Back when I as doing electronic work, I learned a little bit about microphones, not much, but enough to be able to adjust circuits in such a way a microphone would not get feed-back from the speakers.
I'm sure you know what that is called, but I don't remember. Just that we had to reverse the phase to stop the squeal.
Technology has come a long long way in audio equipment, that's for sure.

In the early Windows XP days, I had a program that would display the audio frequencies as multiple sine wave graphs.
I could also play them into a program that would make sheet music from the audio too.
However, what I used the program for was to clean up a few old 78 rpm records.
I could pick the instruments out of the noise and scratch pops, and actually sit there an erase much of the noise.
The program I had was no where near as elaborate as the programs they have today for remastering a song.
Mine was all manual labor of erasing things from the screen that should not be there. Saving it and playing it back to make sure I didn't take out something I shouldn't have.
Then as one would figure, about the time I got my four or five favorite old songs nice and clean, along comes someone with a CD of one already remastered or remade just right.
From there I moved on to renovating old photographs, and actually turned it into a small business for a short time. Not enough money in it doing it all by hand with the free software that came with printers, hi hi.

One short lived business I did, back in the days of transistor radios, was only because I got some great 3 inch speakers on a deal. Instead of paper cones, these speakers all had a plastic cones which the original buyer said were too quick for is purpose. They were designed to go into a transistor radio, but also had a felt smaller cone glued over the circular center where the coil was. This meant they also would not fit into what he wanted to use them in.
Got what was left in the cases, all were full except one, so I had about 185 speakers.
I bought some cardboard tubes to try something. Glued the speakers about 2 inches into the ends of the tubes, with the back of the speaker facing the close end where I did the gluing.
Man did they sound GREAT in those tubes.
So I bought enough tubes, some Ivory colored textured paper to glue around the tubes, and some speaker grill cloth for the ends. I also needed to buy a smaller size tube to put the grill cloth on first, that slipped into the tube where I locked it in place with three short pins, then I wrapped the tube in the paper.
I could buy the speaker wire with a jack on the end for a fair price and soldered these to the speakers before I glued them in, allowing the wire to come out the back between the grill cloth and tube housing.
The completed assembly got glued to a small piece of 1x2 I painted to keep it from rolling around.
They looked nice. Counting the cost of all the parts, and my labor at 5 bucks an hour back then, it came out to like 8 bucks a unit cost. I could only make like 175 of them with the materials I bought. Decided to sell them for 9.95 wholesale or 14.95 retail. Went up to Venture Department Store, who already bought other things from me, and they took 150 of them on sight. I assume they sent them out to their other stores too. They paid me an even 1,500 dollars. I sold the other 25 to individuals around town without problems, some for 15 bucks some for only 10 bucks.
At my full-time job, I only made about 150 bucks a week back then, so this was a windfall for me, hi hi.

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yogi
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Re: Silent letters

Post by yogi »

A lot of people other than myself loved Bose speakers. I got a pair for my computer when I bought Windows 98. Those speakers were still around and functioning when we moved to this house, but I did not bring them with me. The sounds those speakers reproduced from my Windows 98 computer was remarkable. It seems to me, but I really don't recall, that the Bose line was a little more expensive than the average speaker for playing music. Since they sounded great and were full range there was no need to look for alternatives. A couple years before we moved and not too long after I moved up to Windows Vista, I read a review about Bose speakers. They were reviewing whatever was the speaker platform de jour but I recall the author saying that the entire line of Bose products is akin to being fake. They were made of the cheapest quality materials you could find and the construction wasn't exactly state of the art. But, he did admit, they sound great. The reason for the great sound had to do with the baffles and the enclosure for the individual speakers. The way Bose did it didn't demand a high quality speaker in order to sound wonderful. The conclusion in the article is that Bose is acceptable but if you are looking for something with a bit more quality built in, look elsewhere.

I think you could have worked for Bose given your invention. LOL

Audio feedback is the bane of most hearing aides. A lot of that phenomena has to do with proximity of input vs output devices, and you don't have a lot of separation in hearing aides. When mom was being fitted for hers I was amazed that they would work at all, but they performed well most of the time. Mom was really hard of hearing and had to turn up the amplification which is when the feedback would kick in. The whistle was maddening and if she backed off she could not hear everything she wanted to hear. The physics of it all would not allow for amplification without feedback over the entire range of the hearing aides she had, but I understand they have come a long way to overcome that problem. You can indeed play with the phase but that's only effective in certain cases. You end up canceling frequencies that the hard of hearing person might need to have amplified. They say the digital ones can be tuned to get around that problem, and some day I may have to find out. But the price of hearing aides are even more expensive than the high end computers I like to play with. Besides, I think my HyperX headset looks better than any hearing aide I ever saw. :lol:

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