Windows Moving To A Linuix Kernel

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yogi
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Re: Windows Moving To A Linuix Kernel

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I know we are only talking pennies here, but I thought it was highly illegal to modify any currency whatsoever. It seems like plating pennies would be a crime. LOL

I have no real knowledge of how they date things millions of years old, but it used to be by measuring the amount of residual radio active carbon in an item. I guess they know how long it takes for it to decay so that determining an approximate age +/- a few million years is simple.

Just yesterday I read about a meteor that was discovered to have a small segment about 3 billion years old. That's getting close to the beginning of time. LOL

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Kellemora
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Re: Windows Moving To A Linuix Kernel

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Actually, you wouldn't believe all you are allowed to do with both coins and currency.

You can buy paper dollars, the legal ones, with your picture on them, or even a picture of Santa Claus as an example.
The key here is, your image, or the picture of Santa is merely an added on sticker on top of the bill.

Writing on paper currency is actually more common than you think. And unless you do so in such a way it can be considered defacing the currency, whether against the law or not, it has never been enforced.
They even tried to go after a few folks for writing Donald Trump Lives Here on the backs of bills with the Capitol Building on it. But it didn't hold up because the bill was not defaced.
OK, so what actually is being defaced. Rendering the Serial Numbers or Denomination unreadable. Drawing Horns or a Mustache on the image of a president, although should be considered defacing isn't.

As far as the coins go. Putting a copper plating over a steel cent does not change the coin itself.
Plus on another note: You can buy REAL Coinage and cut the coins apart, cut a groove around the edge, etc. When done so to create a magic trick. Unlike paper currency that is property of the government, coinage does not fall under that same category. Although a coin is legal tender, usually worth less than face value, you still bought it.
One of the reasons they went to clad coinage is because the value of the coins metal as worth more than the face value of the coin, and too many were being melted down to sell the metal.
That might be illegal, but I don't think so based on other laws about who owns the coins.
Only the US Mint can create coins, for you to do so would be counterfeiting.
But once you own the coin, I'm pretty sure it is yours to use as you see fit.

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yogi
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Re: Windows Moving To A Linuix Kernel

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Back in the days when gold was used to make some coins, it was common practice to put a bunch in a bag and then shake them up. Tiny pieces of gold would flake off the edges which you could amass and sell as gold dust. I believe that is the source of the laws about defacing currency. I'm not as well informed about today's laws regarding currency, but I do hear conflicting stories about what defacing might be. I was told even writing on the edges of a one dollar bill is illegal - there used to be a website that would track the money if you entered the serial number. And I'd concur with you that I never heard of anybody being prosecuted over defacing currency. I've tried the mustache drawing, by the way. Being a kid I thought it was funny, but the clerk in the store refused to take it. One of us was breaking the law for sure.

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Kellemora
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Re: Windows Moving To A Linuix Kernel

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Shaving the edges of coins is why they started making them grooved around the edges.
Pennies and Nickels are the only two coins they didn't bother with.

When I worked in the counting house at two different companies, both did exactly the same thing.
After we bundled up the bills we wrote a sequential number on the top bill.
At one company we started with #1 on the first of every month, but at the other, the numbers have been running sequential for many years. We didn't have to write the last six digits because they had a sequential numbering machine, and we used another fixed stamp for the other two numbers, only that stamp went on the band not the bill. The sequential number was stamped vertically on the right side of the top of the first bill. They were up to number 22 when I worked there, so I assume that meant they had sent over 22 million bundles of bills to the bank. The denomination of the bundles didn't matter, each bundle got stamped, hi hi. I guess it is possible, the second counting house was at the casino in Alton, IL.

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yogi
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Re: Windows Moving To A Linuix Kernel

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One of the more amazing memes I've seen on the Internet involves some dude burning pallet loads of money. I guess the fed take old bills out of circulation and destroy them. That would be an interesting job for one's resume: burning money. LOL

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Kellemora
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Re: Windows Moving To A Linuix Kernel

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Many moons ago, long before we met, Debi worked at a bank.
They had a machine they ran the money through that punched it full of holes.
She would bring home a few bags of these hole punches from the bills, put them in a glass jar, and give them as gifts, hi hi.
The money first had to be sent to a Federal Reserve Bank for counting. It used to be forwarded to a main federal reserve bank in the old days. But now the bank gets it back to dispose of. She said she thought the old money went out to the Crossville Steam Plant to be burned as fuel, and even though worthless, it was still delivered in an armored car with four guards ensuring it all went into the boilers and was burned. Now she thinks it all just goes straight to a federal reserve bank and whatever they do with it she don't know.

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yogi
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Re: Windows Moving To A Linuix Kernel

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So who decides what money needs to be taken out of circulation, and exactly from where do they take that money? I can imagine banks exchanging old money for new money, but again, how do they decide? The quantities of old bills that get destroyed is enormous and I'm wondering if banks are the only places that take money out of circulation.

At one time I had a vile with a shredded bill - I think it was a $10,000 bill or something like that. Got it at Dollar General on a clearance sale. LOL

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Kellemora
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Re: Windows Moving To A Linuix Kernel

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Any bill that has the size of a 9mm hole in it, or an edge torn which crosses over the printed border line is removed from circulation by the banks. Also if they are too crumpled, soft, or frayed to be used in an ATM machine.

When I was younger, if you found a decayed bill, as long as the serial numbers were readable, you could get it replaced at any bank. My cousin George decided to test this and placed a dollar bill on a wet bed of dirt and laid a wooden plank over it for a whole month. Needless to say, there was nothing of the bill left other than it's imprint. He must have put a piece of waxed paper over it to keep it from sticking to the wood plank.
He scooped up the dirt in one piece and put it in a cigar box to take to the bank.
They invited him to a small meeting room where at first he thought he was going to get a scolding, hi hi.
But no, some guy came into the room with a sprayer and sprayed some liquid over the bills imprint in the dirt, then shined an orange lensed flashlight on it. Yep it's real he said. Then after they wrote down the serial number and some other info and had him sign it, they went back out and he was given a crisp new dollar.
I'm sure it cost the bank twenty or more dollars to handle that transaction, hi hi.

I did something just to see what would happen many years ago when I was in my teens.
I wrote a check on a red shop towel at the gas station to pay for the gas.
The gas station accepted it and included it in their bank deposit.
I got it back with my cancelled checks and had it in a picture frame in my basement office for years.
It was legal to do so back then. Not these days though.

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yogi
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Re: Windows Moving To A Linuix Kernel

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Actually I think it's still legal to write a check on any media with one caveat. The routing number has to be there printed in that magnetic ink they use. LOL

I'm very impressed with your story about the bank's verification of that dollar bill. I recall one incident in my late teens when I was working and being paid by check. One particular week I took the check to my bank to cash it and was given some freshly printed paper money. That same night my sweetie and I went to a drive-in movie where you would pay while sitting in your car. I gave her a $20 bill, and she examined it. Then she asked me to pull over to the side because the manager wanted to have a word with me. I did, and the man said it was a counterfeit bill. I laughed and told him I just got it from the local bank a few hours ago. He insisted and pointed to some mark on the bill that was fake. He gave me the bill back and told me to take it back to the bank and explain to them what he said. I didn't have any "clean" money with me so that my date and I did some miniature golfing instead. I gave them the $20 bill the drive-in would not accept. No problem. We played two rounds in fact. LOL

I kind of think banks would have a way to spot fake money and that the drive in guy was misinformed.

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Kellemora
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Re: Windows Moving To A Linuix Kernel

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I got a few five dollar bills from the bank where the ink around the letters was sorta runny and blurry, like it was too wet when they printed them.
I did take it back to the bank and they replaced it, saying it was genuine, just sloppy.
I think it was counterfeit and they didn't want to admit they gave me a bad bill.

Many eons ago, we had a customer in the greenhouses who bought a lot of plants, and when CJ put them in his deposit bag for the bank, they sent them all back to him saying they were counterfeit. He spent a day or two studying each of them and could not see a single difference between them and normal bills.
Not wanting to take the loss, he ended up spending them one at a time over the next few days and never had one not accepted. Nor did he hear any comments from the store owners he used them at about getting a bad bill.

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yogi
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Re: Windows Moving To A Linuix Kernel

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There are a ton of ways to verify a bill is genuine. All I know is about the watermark and the fibers in the paper. Apparently the paper they use to print real money is highly secured and not available in the wilds. It seems hardly worth the effort to counterfeit money these days when it's so easy to break into computers and steal identities. Then there is the bitcoin and ransomware that everybody seems to know how to do. Maybe only the dumb crooks counterfeit money anymore.

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Kellemora
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Re: Windows Moving To A Linuix Kernel

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Places that use those marker pens to tell if a bill is legal or not, can be easily defeated by treating a counterfeit bill with an agent that neutralizes the pen and/or makes it show the safe color instead of the danger color.
And it was a common readily available product at most grocery stores.
Trouble is, I don't remember what it was anymore. Seems like it was simple though, either a particular fruit juice or a certain type of tea mixed with something like almond extract, but just a drop of almond extract in a whole pint of the liquid.

Most stores only check 20, 50, and 100 dollar bills.
Which is why you can get by passing fake 10's fairly easily.
Some counterfeiters are so lazy, they only change the denominational corners of a 1 dollar bill. Knowing checkout clerks don't really look that close at the rest of the bill to see it reads like the 1 dollar bill it really is.
While others may go to the trouble of bleaching out the original 1 dollar bill to print a copy of a 10 dollar bill on it.

Not too long ago, down here in TN, some tattoo artist got busted for changing 50 dollar bills to 20 dollar bills. They never said how he was doing it, but it must have been fairly simple for him to do, hi hi.

A number of years ago, a girl was changing 1 dollar bills into 10 dollar bills using Decal It, a type of transfer liquid.
She scanned and printed on normal paper a 10 dollar bill, then would use the decal it to capture the monetary amounts.
She would then wash the paper off the decal and overlay it on the 1 dollar bills corners.
Apparently doing it that way is was thin enough not to change the feel of the bill, and somehow just opaque enough to hid the original number.

Debi works as a part-time cashier and she was taught to look at the eagle on the shield and the number 20 in the lower right, both should be raised ink and sparkle. On a 50 they check the star and the 50 for the same thing.
Most blind people are taught to feel for the star or eagle and shield too.
I know the blind girl I used to give a ride to church for a couple of years could tell a 1 from a 5 even though they have no markings on them. She said they have a different feel, a different texture, and a different sound after they have been in circulation. New ones are harder to tell apart.
I guess they have really sensitive fingers, because she could tell if someone put the paper in the copier upside down, hi hi.

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yogi
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Re: Windows Moving To A Linuix Kernel

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You know too much about altering money. LOL Please don't tell me anymore. I don't have time to testify. :lol:

I attended the University of Illinois for a short time when it was located on Chicago's Navy Pier. At the entry to the pier there was a newsstand that also sold candies and a few other snacks. It was a great location and the traffic was heavy at times but I rarely bought anything there. One day I wanted a candy bar and gave the guy a dollar bill. He fondled it for a while but then asked me to identify the denomination. That's when it occurred to me that he was blind. Apparently he too could identify paper money most of the time and hand out change as if his vision was normal. He was in business for as long as I attended school there which tells me that his customers were pretty honest people. Back in those days it never occurred to anyone to rob a blind man.

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Re: Windows Moving To A Linuix Kernel

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Missouri School for the Blind used to train folks to operate pretzel, hot dog, and news stands. Probably a lot of other things too. The blind gal I gave a ride to church for a few years worked at a drapery company doing of all things, hemming the tops and bottoms of custom-fitted drapery. She said it was so simple she could do it blindfolded, hi hi. Then she explained that they were already folded and pinned and all she did really was run them through the sewing machine, one right after the other, all day, every day, quite boring, didn't pay much, but she needed the money.
She also said another girl from the home works there as a selvage trimmer, which is done an a cutting machine that works about like a sewing machine except instead of joining it cuts off the material.
People who can see trim the threads off the ends after I do the sewing, but I don't know what happens over where she works.

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yogi
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Re: Windows Moving To A Linuix Kernel

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It's a wonderful thing for people who are not sighted to be able to work and be productive. You got to wonder, however, if they are being taken advantage of. I know the work is trivial, but boring and repetitious jobs for meager wagers sounds like a captured market, i.e., slave labor. Of course the sightless person feels useful and the business operator is getting a bargain worker. I would think that's an overall positive.

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Kellemora
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Re: Windows Moving To A Linuix Kernel

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When I owned Wonder Plants, I hired almost all Handicapped employee's, and believe me, that was not a cheap undertaking.
Had to completely rebuild two bathrooms, install wheelchair access, install emergency exits designed for the handicapped, and provide for wide parking spaces for those who drove, over and above the legally required handicapped parking spaces.
And no they were not paid less than any other employee doing the same type of job, in fact, many were paid more.
I had to hire a special supervisor with certain medical degrees and licenses, she didn't come cheap, but she was one of the best employee's in a supervisory capacity I ever hired.
And to be perfectly honest, Yes we Did get a few kickbacks, one from the Federal government, one from State government, and two from the County government, and somewhere around four or five over time from the City government. However, ALL of those funds HAD to be spent on the improvements they were allocated for.
I think once a while back I mentioned that those who were in wheelchairs did not like the required improvements and preferred they either were not their, or they went and used the other bathrooms instead.
Also, despite having to install the ramps, most of them would rather jump the curb than use the ramp, said it is easier. Takes less arm muscles to jump a curb than it does to navigate up a ramp.
I really loved working with all those guys, and always listened to how they thought things could be changed to make it easier and faster for them. Heck, one thing we added even helped them stay cleaner while working. Even OSHA came and looked at what they requested, since it had to be approved by them. OSHA doesn't really like anything THEY didn't think of first, but both of the inspectors really like the lap shield we installed, first a simple one, and then a much nicer one.
The state gave us a small training bonus for each new employee in a wheelchair we hired, but not for the first ones.
Then the city came by and in conjunction with a home for the handicapped gave us an incentive to hire a couple from there. Basically one months salary to see if they could handle the job with only one arm. Not easy, but a few did it.
Needless to say, I still needed several workers who were not wheelchair bound in order to move the large trays of plants down the roller conveyor system and pack them in boxes for shipping.
We made one heck of a lot of changes those first couple of years to give more jobs to the handicapped than we thought possible at first. They are great workers. Unfortunately, vision was a requirement to do the job, so we couldn't hire the blind, although we did hire one to replace the growing media that landed in the lower trough back into the feed bin. This could have been done with an automated bucket type conveyor lift too.
Loved working with them all. Shame the crooks drove the business under and me broke, hi hi.

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yogi
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Re: Windows Moving To A Linuix Kernel

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I think you did a marvelous thing by using people who are physically challenged to work for you. We had a very diverse workforce at Motorola but not too many that were visibly disabled. I know of a few who came but didn't stay long. Apparently they could do the work but the fast pace and all the able bodied folks around them made it uncomfortable. Now that you mentioned it, I believe they hired a specially trained nurse to be on the premises too. Motorola was on the losing end of a discrimination law suit many years ago, and after they admitted no fault they made a lot of changes to accommodate minorities and handicapped people.

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Kellemora
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Re: Windows Moving To A Linuix Kernel

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Honestly, the hardest working and most pleasant crews to be working around were those in wheelchairs.
It helped that I listened to what they wanted over and above what OSHA required, hi hi.
Left to themselves, they will improve any system by working together as a team.
Naturally each were assigned a part of the series of jobs, but were allowed to move around and swap what they were doing. This was great because it alleviated boredom as well as increased efficiency. One guy with a painful left arm who worked partway down the right of the assembly table, asked to be moved to the left side, so he didn't have to pull the next container toward him. It more than alleviated his minor pain but allowed him to work faster. I was able to use two instead of three on the first leg of the line because of him. Plus they all worked together to put who fit best where.
If I had another business I would surely have hired the handicapped wherever possible.

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yogi
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Re: Windows Moving To A Linuix Kernel

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One of the "culture changes" Motorola had to make involved the idea of teamwork. There is a tendency for every man to be for himself when the competition gets tough, but that's not the best way to conduct a business. The competition was fierce in the cell phone industry and it was a matter of survival to work together as a team. It did come to that after many years and productivity did increase. It wasn't good enough to stay in business, as you know, so Motorola had to sell off that part of the company. However, just as all the handicapped employees you hired formed a team with a common goal, Motorola, the corporation, did likewise. It was a great place to work, until they decided I was of no use to them anymore.

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Kellemora
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Re: Windows Moving To A Linuix Kernel

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All I can say about Motorola is over the years we never had problems with anything that had their logo on it.
It was the only brand of TV my dad would buy. Although he did buy an RCA once, he gave that away fairly fast to an Uncle, and his older Motorola TV went to grandpa on my mom's side of the family.

The radio-telephone the company installed in my car always worked great, even in areas where it shouldn't have worked at all, always clear and crisp.

But companies have to do what they have to do to remain profitable and hold their lead or edge in the marketplace.

Sad you lost your job though!

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