The Debate Translation

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yogi
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The Debate Translation

Post by yogi » 11 Oct 2016, 06:53

Hard to believe, but I've recently become a member of the Imgur gang. Imgur has been around a long time and you would think I'd have been lurking there way before now, but I haven't. At any rate, there are some pretty interesting comments on Imgur. It comes off as the picture version of Twitter. It's honest people being honest, most of the time. The fun part about Imgur is trying to decide who sees things clearly, and who is just there for 15 seconds of fame. I ran across somebody's "plain English" interpretation of last Sunday's debate. Since I watched the debate in it's entirety, this interpretation fascinated me. The interpreter is spot on. If you are going to take the time to read it, be warned that is some street talk in it. Then again, it is supposed to be that way.

DEBATE INTERPRETATION: http://imgur.com/gallery/Y55XO

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Icey
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Re: The Debate Translation

Post by Icey » 11 Oct 2016, 14:53

If you cut through all the political jargon and the way in which politicians learn to avoid direct answers to questions they find tricky, you can see how people come to the conclusion of the above interpretation. Happens here as well, only we don't need to look on Imgur; people openly put their opinions in "plain English" in letters to newspapers and open debates. Imagine what's said behind four walls. : )

Oh dear. I'm not taking sides, but it made for amusing reading. Thanks for that, Yogi.

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yogi
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Re: The Debate Translation

Post by yogi » 11 Oct 2016, 15:20

Icey: It's ok to have an opinion and take sides. That's how we learn from each other. :smile:

Imgur is just one of many grassroots social networks. There are a lot of Brits on that site as well as people from all over the world. It's truly global in it's membership. The "interpretation" is humorous on it's own, but it is more laugh provoking if you witnessed the original debate. The Imgur meme is more or less saying the same thing you comment upon. Not much was said that could not be put into a five minute reading. It's a parody of our political process and as such we are laughing at ourselves. Newsprint and spontaneous debates are so last century that none of the millennials are into it. Thus the piece is on Imgur.

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Icey
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Re: The Debate Translation

Post by Icey » 11 Oct 2016, 16:48

LOl - well I can't possibly take sides after reading that satirical piece, but it was quite enjoyable, and it made me smile.

I have to say though, that debates aren't "last century" at all. They go off in universities all the time, on TV - and between pals. How else is conversation going to be continued beyond a few words unless topics/subjects're discussed between family and friends?

Whatever, the site sounds quite interesting. I'm sure the British contributors could think of plenty of "interpretations" of our own political debates and comments. It'd be amusing to read some. : )

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pilvikki
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Re: The Debate Translation

Post by pilvikki » 12 Oct 2016, 16:33

i'm an imgurer by proxy, my middle daughter is a big fan and i'm getting tons of her favourites emailed to me or posted on fb.

the general imgur crowd is also way more polite and intelligent than the bottomfeeders on fb.

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Icey
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Re: The Debate Translation

Post by Icey » 12 Oct 2016, 18:28

Well that sounds like a good start; but then, what do I know? The only things I know about FB are from what people send me or tell me. It's the general comments which I find absurd. The banal chatter seems to be the order of the day for millions of people!
Everyone likes to get away from being too serious at times, and to have a laugh, but forgive me if I'm wrong - FB seems to have areas where intelligence doesn't poke its nose in at all. : (

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yogi
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Re: The Debate Translation

Post by yogi » 12 Oct 2016, 18:53

Facebook is everything you heard about it, and more. There is one thing that I do like about it, however. After all these years I've spent in discussion forums and chat sites, I'm convinced that places like Facebook are a true reflection of society. All that craziness you hear about and see is not entirely fake. People really are that way. The anonymity in today's social networks allows people to get away with things they would not in a face to face confrontation. Thus I think Facebook is simply a reflection of real life. It may be exaggerated a bit, but it's pretty true to form.

Imgur is similar. The format is different in that the messaging media is pictures and video as opposed to text and voice. I'd have to agree with Vikki and say it seems a little more civil on Imgur than on Facebook. Then again, I've not been an active member there very long. My impressions could change.

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Icey
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Re: The Debate Translation

Post by Icey » 13 Oct 2016, 09:09

Yes, you've just echoed what someone else told me they think about FB - that the daily chats, for example how many slices of toast a person's had for breakfast, which then seems to be agreed by dozens of other users, IS really how people are. I mean, this's the bit I find baffling.

So one person happens to mention that they like 1 slice of toast. Some agree, while others might say they prefer 2, 3 or more. Nothing wrong with that per se, but for so many people to get involved about a subject which really doesn't matter, and without moving up a notch onto something else .... well apart from maybe a couple of minutes on their personal preferences, I honestly don't know anyone who converses in that manner! Or, is this just by the typed words on FB, but NOT how they'd natter to a person's face?

I find it interesting to observe how people interact these days. We eat out quite regularly, and I'm staggered by the amount of folk who actually use their phones whilst in the middle of eating, or who break off to check for incoming texts. Worse, I've seen couples who barely open their mouths to each other, but who can be quite busy on their phones to other people. I find it quite amazing that anyone could be so rude while they're in company, and only a few weeks ago, a woman caught my eye, glanced at her partner who was jabbering away loudly, then raised her eyebrows as she looked at me again; obviously fed up with being ignored. I think that technology's addictive, but not in a good way. It's removing the art of conversation, so that if faced with someone in person, people seem to feel awkward and unable to know what to say.

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