So Much For Walls

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yogi
Posts: 5052
Joined: 14 Feb 2015, 15:49

So Much For Walls

Post by yogi » 06 Apr 2019, 07:52


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Kellemora
Posts: 2621
Joined: 16 Feb 2015, 11:54

Re: So Much For Walls

Post by Kellemora » 06 Apr 2019, 11:16

Yeppers!
Saw a video a few days ago of a backyard dog who finally managed to jump a ten foot concrete wall, and it didn't have mortar joints for it to use either. It took several tries before he finally figured out the right speed and angle to leap to make it to the top, but he did.
Probably was a dog in heat on the other side for him to go to that much work, hi hi.

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yogi
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Joined: 14 Feb 2015, 15:49

Re: So Much For Walls

Post by yogi » 06 Apr 2019, 14:17

It must be easier to climb walls when you have four legs. LOL
Way back in high school phys ed class we had to do something similar. All I remember about that is the guys up on top of the wall had to pull me up. I couldn't make it on my own.

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Kellemora
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Joined: 16 Feb 2015, 11:54

Re: So Much For Walls

Post by Kellemora » 07 Apr 2019, 09:56

We had to climb walls and a lot of other things in boot camp.
Back on the farm we had several concrete storage bins for dirt, mulch, rock, etc.
The very end bin was about 3 feet away from the foundation for the boiler room.
As kids, we could get between these two walls and climb all the way up to the roof of the boiler room.
Of course, this was the hard way to do it, since on the other side of the building there was only a 2 foot step up to a valley that ran across the top back of the coal bins, and from there you could just step onto the arched roof.
Also, being a dumb kid. On a dare, I climbed all the way to the top rung of our 120 foot tall Weiderholt Chimney.
The danger level was high because a few of the rungs were loose and could be pulled out, so all of them were probably bad. A few years after I did this, they had a company come out to repair the top of the chimney and they built a moving scaffold they could work their way up to the top. In their process of making repairs, the removed all the rungs. Sawed them off then used a punch to drive the stem into the chimney so they fell to the bottom inside. Then tuckpointed and/or filled the holes. There was a big iron door in the bottom of the chimney you could walk inside and look up. It looked a lot taller from the inside.

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