Ubuntu Mainframes from IBM

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yogi
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Ubuntu Mainframes from IBM

Post by yogi » 19 Aug 2015, 11:14

This one's for you Gary. :smile:

It seems that IBM has been supporting Linux for more than a dozen years, but now they are offering LinuxONE mainframes. While this may seem like a great idea, mainframes are still a niche market and likely to disappear at some point. The significance of this move is that IBM apparently thinks there is enough interest in Linux Ubuntu to justify their support to developers.

http://arstechnica.com/information-tech ... l-project/

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Kellemora
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Re: Ubuntu Mainframes from IBM

Post by Kellemora » 19 Aug 2015, 20:14

Hmm, IBM z-machines already support Linux, Unix and others, quite often RedHat is already installed on an IBM z-machine right along with their own OS's.
I don't understand enough about mainframes to have anything intelligent to say one way or the other.
I know where my son works, they have two huge mainframes, besides the hundreds of blade servers lined up one right after the other. I assume they all work together somehow.
Heck, I can't even get Windows 10 to work on a brand new computer, hi hi...

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yogi
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Re: Ubuntu Mainframes from IBM

Post by yogi » 20 Aug 2015, 08:31

The news here is that it's Ubuntu and Unity getting the attention from IBM. Perhaps Canonical has come of age.

It's disappointing, for you more so than me, that Windows 10 is giving you so many network problems. I've found it to be quick and capable handling nodes on my LAN. To be honest I was a bit surprised, but it performs better than Windows 7 in that regard. Microsoft has gone freaky with it's focus on security in Windows 10, and I'm guessing that your matrix of computers is confusing it. It's probably just a matter of permissions somewhere along the line.

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Kellemora
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Re: Ubuntu Mainframes from IBM

Post by Kellemora » 20 Aug 2015, 15:38

Hi Yogi

I think you have the Windows 10 PRO version.
The upgrade, including the ISO is for both Home and Pro, so if it is HOME it locks out a lot of stuff during the install.

I downloaded and burned a new ISO, wiped the hard drive, partitioned it in half, and installed Windows 10 on the first partition. Install went OK and I got it up and running, after entering all the data all over again.
Still, the selectors shown on the Win10 tutorials are simply not on my version or the new one I downloaded.

Even the IT guy who stopped by for about fifteen minutes was flabbergasted. He said the settings he needs to get my LAN up and running are not in the drop down list where they belong. He did a few things that made it faster, but I have no idea what, other than turning off a bunch a stuff for security reasons.
All he could come up with was he would ask around at work and see why. He thinks it could be the computer itself somehow doesn't accept full install, then he added, well that makes no sense either.
He's supposed to give me a call if he can find anything out.

On a different note:
Each time I replace a MoBo I buy a new CPU. I've got a couple of mobo's that didn't last very long before something went out on it. Like the frau's computer, the only thing that went out was the graphics, and I see no swollen capacitors.
I found the mobo she has in her old computer at Tiger Direct for only 35 bucks as a close out, discontinued item.
But all the other mobo's seem to say they take the same range of CPUs.

I have one computer here that only the Ethernet went out. I used an old Ethernet card in it, which worked for a bit, then it quit. Added another known working one, and it didn't work, so I figured the slot went bad, both of them. If I put the Ethernet card in another machine, it works, so it's not the card. So I assume the mobo is going south on that machine too. I just hate to keep buying new CPUs each time I buy a new mobo, since they are the expensive part.
However, that being said. I've got several memory sticks here which are supposed to work in my machines. I can never get them to work, not even by themselves or with all of the same speed rating.
This is why I always take my machines to the repair guy, but he will NOT transfer a CPU from one board to another. He said if the mobo is bad, especially a mobo where the CPU is what drives the graphics, it is more than likely it's the CPU that went south first, taking the mobo circuit with it.
I sorta understand that, as back when I worked on gaming machines, if certain parts went bad, they usually took out a lot of other parts as well.
Or in a computer, if the negative five volts gets lost, it usually fries the mobo and cpu, and possible some other things as well.

I have a hunch what fried the video on two of our machines is a bad KVM switch. You can't hotplug a monitor, and I think that is what it started doing, so I quit using it. Probably should have thrown it away instead of sticking it in my junk box.

Have a great evening Yogi!

TTUL
Gary

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yogi
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Re: Ubuntu Mainframes from IBM

Post by yogi » 20 Aug 2015, 18:56

The "free" upgrade to Windows 10 is said to be an "in kind" upgrade. That means if your old computer has the right stuff, you will be upgraded to the Pro version. Otherwise you get the Home edition. This type of upgrading is automatic when you sign up for a reserved copy of Windows 10. You get what Micorsoft thinks is the equivalent of what you already have. The word on the street is that free is only for people who do the upgrade. Everyone else pays.

I have the upgrade notice on my Windows 7 desktop - the one that replaced the silver Yogi. I did not install the weekly updates that prepare the machine for the transition, nor did I reserve a copy of Windows 10. My reasoning is that I refuse to do an upgrade. It will be a clean install if I switch over. However, I did download an iso and a USB version of Windows 10, and it appears to be the Pro version. As you know I've been beta testing since last October and in theory the last update before the final release was what we know as Windows 10 today. It turns out that last upgrade didn't last very long and I tried to recover and then reset the system. None of that worked so that I was left with no choice but to reinstall Windows 10 - I did that from the USB memory if I recall correctly. I isolated this beta software to my laptop so that it would not be able to contaminate my tower and have two versions of Linux in there along with Windows 10. I had to fudge Grub to get it to work my way, but everything is copacetic as I type this. My point is that I installed the downloaded version of Windows 10 into a previously wiped partition. I did not have to register because I am one of those "Insider" guys, which also entitled me to the Pro version. My OS is registered by the way. It was done automatically (via that ubiquitous Cloud) because "they" know who I am and what I've been doing. LOL

So, I'm thinking now that I can install this Widows 10 Pro into any computer that has the appropriate hardware. It won't install if you don't have what it's looking for. That could be your problem. That netbook you got for your wife might be seriously lacking some memory or processor capability and thus Windows 10 won't install the Pro version. However, I am pretty sure the Silver Yogi has everything for the Pro to work. If you have a spare drive or partition, you might want to try and install it there. Just copy the product key from an existing Windows 7 box if you need one, but I'm pretty sure you can set it up without a key. Once you set it up look at the network. This will tell you if you have a hardware problem or not. Also, if you need a copy of what I used, I can send it to you, but I'm sure you downloaded exactly what I did.


You seem to be very hard on computers and peripherals. Because you get so many failures, I think you are doing the right thing by replacing the processor when you get a new mobo. The exception would be if you simply upgraded instead of replacing a fried system. Just remove the old processor, clean off all the thermal compound, and reinstall it as usual into the new board. That would be ideal.

A motherboard with a lot of built in features is like a human body. If your kidney goes, it takes the heart with it. The liver might fail too. All these vital organs interact with each other so that a problem in one will affect the others. The same kind of thing happens on motherboards. The central processor runs everything. If a circuit burns up, it may take part of the processor with it. Or vice versa.

The motherboard has a chip set which is the buffer between the CPU and the rest of the motherboard. The CPU, the chipset, and RAM all have specs that have to be met in order to work. You cannot just take known good RAM and stuff it into any motherboard with any processor. You need to know the model numbers of what you have and go to the motherboard manufacturer website to see what is compatible. Your CPU and memory type must appear on their list or you are taking a risk. You can make things work if they are not compatible, but there is no guaranty as to how long they will work together. Mix and match is a great way to save money, but it's not always a success.

The thing I do not like about the high performance computer components we use these days is that they are extremely sensitive to electrostatic discharge damage. When you handle anything motherboard related, be certain you are grounded properly. Otherwise you can blow out an entire motherboard and not know it. Well, I don't own a ground strap but have years of experience handling static sensitive components. I was able to build my ASUS Maximus without blowing it up accidentally. I took a risk and was lucky, but you may not be so fortunate.

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Kellemora
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Re: Ubuntu Mainframes from IBM

Post by Kellemora » 21 Aug 2015, 15:20

Hi Yogi

The IT guy got back to me already. Told me to order a copy of Win 7 Pro to get the license. Trouble is, I've looked on-line and the price is no cheaper than paying for Windows 10 upgrade to Pro pack, which I have found can be obtained for $99.00 I think.

The new computer isn't a netbook, we have a netbook with Windows 7 home in it.
It is a Desktop Acer Aspire X which is not upgradable, no slots for anything, not even a second hard drive.
It came with Windows 8.1 and worked great. The rollback did not work, took it back to Win 7 for some reason.
So I reformatted the hard drive and installed Windows 10 from the ISO DVD I downloaded and burned.

Debi just want's her XP back, so all of her familiar programs will run on it the way they used to.

FWIW: Since from my Linux machines, I can see both our Named Domain and Windows Workgroup, I created a folder using Workgroup as the domain name. The Win10 machine can see that easily enough, and read and write to it.
Trouble is, if I make it on her new computer, then I cannot write to it, get permission denied.
I'll probably be able to figure that out before long, since I can write to a PUBLIC shared folder on the Win10 machine from a couple of my machines, but not from all of them, which is strange.

As usual, my best bet is to just take my machines into the computer repair guy and say fix it, hi hi...

Have a great evening Yogi!

TTUL
Gary

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