Adaptive Advertising (again)

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yogi
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Adaptive Advertising (again)

Post by yogi » 03 Mar 2019, 19:03

We have talked about this before, but this story has a slight twist to it. Advertising on the Internet is a sophisticated business. In order to be successful at it the sellers need to know all they can dig up about our behavior on the public net. They profile us and then not only adjust the type of ads we see but also adjust the prices dynamically. The last time I brought this up it was a case where the same identical item from the same seller came up with two different prices depending on which browser I was using. The profiles they keep are different depending on which browser I happen to be shopping with.

Today I decided I need a new keyboard and a new mouse. The ones I am using now will take a back seat and be considered backups should something go wrong with the hardware of the day. I decided on Corsair a long time ago and just needed some motivation to place the order. These are the people that make wonderful steel cabinets for computers and a few other things. In other words they have a good reputation in my experience. I decided on a keyboard and mouse and Googled them. Dozens were available at Amazon and one or two other unknown vendors. Corsair also had them for sale on their website. Amazon and I aren't particularly close these days so I went to Corsair and figured I'd get the best direct from the source. What could go wrong?

They had what I wanted and I filled out the forms for the purchase. I was paying by credit card and they rejected it. Didn't say why, but they claimed there was a problem. So I typed all the information in a second time being more careful. This time it got past the Visa verification and I was presented with a summary of the order along with instructions to press the button to actually place the order. I did. I got another error telling me there was a problem submitting the order and I should fill out the credit card information again. Grudgingly, I did fill in the blanks and not unsurprisingly got rejected yet again.

At that point I was fed up with Corsair's web site. I still wanted that specific keyboard and mouse so I did another Google search and found pretty much the same sellers I did the first time. I rejected Amazon and E-bay on principle and was left with New Egg. I've dealt with these guys before and actually have an account with them so that my profile there is written in granite. Lo and behold the net cost was $20 cheaper than Corsair. Better than that the credit card went through first time and I didn't even have to fill in the blanks - they already had the information they wanted. So I clicked the "buy" button and will now wait a week or so for the new hardware.

Since I have some experience writing software and creating web pages I get particularly frustrated and irate when I run across ones that do not work because of poor design. Corsair makes high end high quality gamer stuff. It's disappointing to see that they can't carry that tradition to their website as well.

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Kellemora
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Re: Adaptive Advertising (again)

Post by Kellemora » 04 Mar 2019, 11:36

Since I do everything on Linux, I often hit websites who's Shopping Cart software that either does not work right, or it wants to do something like have me fill in a form which apparently only works on Windows computers.
There's no reason for a website to have features that don't work with Google or Firefox, regardless of which OS they are run on.

I got after my doctor a few times because his parent company sends out this stupid survey after every visit.
I know for a fact the parent company runs all of its servers on Linux.
So when I'm told I have to use Internet Explorer to complete the survey, I tell them where to go in such a nice way they should enjoy the trip. I also remind them they are running Linux servers because they are too cheap to run Windows servers, but expect me to buy WinDOZE to answer their stupid survey.
My complaints must have done some good, because now I can do the survey in Google Chrome, Firefox, or even the Linux tagged browsers.

My host provider called me a few days ago trying to push me to using their WordPress Templates.
I asked him if anything was wrong with my website the way it is.
He said no, he looked at it, and was most surprised I was running a condensed version of my HTML5 and all of the images I use are compacted. Most folks don't go to all that trouble, and it is mobile friendly.
I then talked about all the trouble I had trying to use a WordPress site and Template, how after spending hours of getting it to work right, they would change something and I would have to do it all over again, and after finding another template they didn't mess with. After about four times of having to completely redo the website I just shut it down.
I told him, I only have two main questions I've been trying to get answered and can't seem to get them answered.
He then said he can't help me because he's only in the sales department, and gave me another number to call, hi hi.

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yogi
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Re: Adaptive Advertising (again)

Post by yogi » 04 Mar 2019, 16:28

It's been many years since I've seen a website other than ones run by Microsoft demand I use Internet Explorer and nothing else. That used to be a legitimate request when IE dominated the browser world. Even then it was seen as a way to force people to use Microsoft products. The loss of market share and the outrage from people who don't need anything Microsoft changed the way web sites are made. These days even Mircorsoft is telling people not to use IE, but they are pushing their latest brainchild, Edge. I will on occasion run across web sites that want IE, Foxfire, or Chrome which covers over 95% of the market. That happens when I'm in my VM version of Linux and the distro has it's own browser. I don't bother complaining to anyone, but I do stop doing business with the companies that can't make a web page that I can use. Then there are those companies who sometimes send follow up surveys. I DO vent there, but it's really useless at that point. The surveys are for marketing purposes and the website developers never see my comments.

It's still fascinating to me that a given product will go for different prices depending on the browser and computer you are using. That's one reason I keep changing my environment. It keeps those pesky marketers on their toes. LOL

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Re: Adaptive Advertising (again)

Post by Kellemora » 05 Mar 2019, 19:53

I forget the fancy wording used by Amazon for the fluctuating prices, but folks are learning enough about them that won't buy until are given the lowest price they were given in their first search of that product. I know, I'm one of them, hi hi.

Some of the medical websites would only let you in with IE for a long time. Now I don't see too many that don't recognize all web browsers. It seems if they want to control something on your computer they get picky, or send you a pop-up that blocks the whole screen.

I use an AdBlocker and a Cookie Killer both. What kills me is I can set the AdBlocker to still display the ad, but off the right edge of the screen so I don't see it when zoomed out. At some websites, I still get the message I have their ads blocked when I can zoom in and see they are there, hi hi. In other words, they know too much about what is displayed on my screen!

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Re: Adaptive Advertising (again)

Post by yogi » 06 Mar 2019, 09:42

I was a fan of ad blockers until I discovered that their scope is limited. Companies will pay the people who write that software to bypass the blocking and that makes their use pointless. There are two things most browsers these days have built into them that effectively block ads. One is the "private window" mode and the other is the "reader view" mode. Each of these modes pick out the text only and displays that. In some instances cookies are blocked, which usually generates a flag from the advertisers claiming I'm not being fair. LOL

Opera browser is about the most effective one I've used to block ads without any intervention on my part. I know it's effective because I get the most objections from advertisers when I use that browser. For the most part I only use it to administer the servers I have, but it's also my go-to browser for Twitter (Tweetdeck). About half the time I click a link to read an article I am confronted with a pay-gate saying that if I don't allow ads I have to pay cash up front to see their content. Oddly enough none of the other browsers I use get that message very often. That's how I know Opera is working well.

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Re: Adaptive Advertising (again)

Post by Kellemora » 06 Mar 2019, 13:07

One thing about writing is the amount of research involved.
Whenever I get faced with a pop-op complaining about my blocking cookies or ads that I cannot bypass, I just back out and move on to the next site. Most of the time, they don't have the content I'm looking for anyhow. On the rare occasion when I know they do, I may pause ad blocking, but still keep all tracking cookies blocked.

Going back a few years here, I was using Juno for certain e-mails. I had their free version so it had a box ad on the left. And if you accidentally opened something over the ad, it would complain and in some cases stop working until you uncovered the ad. Basically it meant you had to keep your composing window sized down. But then we learned a trick. We could Tile the window into four panes and make all the windows tiny except the composing window, but still had to keep the ad window it's original size. No problem we just put it in the top left pane and let it cover everything in that pane hi hi. Put the two other panes along side it, and made the bottom pane as wide as our screen for composing.
Not much different than writing in this window with the other stuff above it on the screen.

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yogi
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Re: Adaptive Advertising (again)

Post by yogi » 07 Mar 2019, 08:09

I must say that what you describe is pretty clever programming by Juno. LOL I think I understand the "trick" of using four widows instead of just one, but the ad had to be visible and not resized nonetheless. When I use Linux I replace the standard terminal with something called Terminator. This does exactly what you are describing but keeps it all within one frame. Thus I can split the terminal screen any number of ways and sizes and do two or more things at once. I can see that coming in handy when developing programs, but I seldom have a need for it. It's just cute and I like using it. :grin:

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Re: Adaptive Advertising (again)

Post by Kellemora » 07 Mar 2019, 11:32

When I was writing for Hachette, I tried using twin monitors so I could cut n paste and move things from one open file to the other I was working on. Although it is convenient, it also caused a few other headaches for me. I could still keep my main working screen the size I liked for writing, and had my working directives at the top of the other screen, and the outlines with editorial notes on the bottom of the other screen.
When I needed to research something by opening a new workspace and a browser, everything on the other screens would basically disappear because I was no longer in that workspace. OK, to fix that problem, instead of using another workspace, I would do like you guys using windows and drop the main page into the systray (lower panel on Linux) and open a new browser in the main window. This way the other two screens are still up on the other monitor. However, when you open a new browser this way, it may spread across both monitors or be undersized and you need to stop and resize the browser window.
Great, got what I needed, I drop that into the systray and open the other browser, only to find by resizing the other browser window it affected this browser window, so I had to resize it back again now too.

This is why I prefer using separate computers, and not all of them are on the KVM switch, else I wouldn't see what is up on them while on another computer. It doesn't matter if I have to use the KVM to get off the page I'm working on to go do a little research, I can still see the old outlined and edited copy on the other computer screen. In some cases, rather than using another computer, especially if I know I'll be cutting and pasting, I will just jump over to a different workspace on my same computer as I'm doing my work. Using different workspaces only saves from opening and closing programs in the systray. How I left a program when I jumped to another workspace is how it will be when I jump back, only now I have the article I needed to cut n paste on the clipboard ready to use.

Having all of these features available to me on Linux has spoiled me greatly. I don't think I could function trying to use a Windows computer anymore. Linux is just too dang versatile!

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Re: Adaptive Advertising (again)

Post by yogi » 07 Mar 2019, 20:11

Windows has had the option for separate work spaces for quite a while. They did a lot of work to improve it in Windows 10 and I think it now would rival what you are doing on Linux. I'm not clear on how many work spaces you can have in Windows, and I'm pretty sure there is no limit in Linux. These work spaces are very useful in situations such as yours where you need the ability to switch between different desktop environments and not lose anything in the process. Copy and Paste between work spaces? Never gave that much thought, but it's probably possible. Widows 10 has multiple tiers in its clipboard so that you can scroll through the copy strings stored in your clipboard and paste what you want elsewhere. I can copy from the Windows host into my Linux VM with no trouble so that I'd think it would be a no brainer to do it within different Windows work spaces.

Foxfire browser has the option of opening each tab in a separate process. When you do that you can easily max out your CPU cycles if the tab count gets high enough. I'm certain, too, that when you open more than one instance of Foxfire each has its own thread. I can't see why one instance would have any baring on how the others are working. In effect it is indeed two different browsers when you have more than one instance going. It wasn't always that way.

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Re: Adaptive Advertising (again)

Post by Kellemora » 08 Mar 2019, 11:13

Don't you find it interesting that nearly every breakthrough feature pioneered by the Linux community has eventually been adopted by Mickey$oft and added to their system?

You made me go look at the Win10 machine.
I cannot see any way to add a second panel at the top, or add more workspaces.
I did see they now call the Systray, Taskbar.
It does show I can move the Taskbar to the Top, or to the Left or Right, but not add a second one on the screen.
Maybe it is only a feature if you buy higher priced versions still named Windows10.

As far as the clipboard goes, we've had multiple tier clipboards for a long time, but I normally use the standard clipboard, it saves time and two extra clicks. An easier way to copy several things onto a page is to create a file and then use the copy-to instead of copy and click on the filename. It comes up where it says copy to desktop you can add copy to filename under that button. So it is just a right-click, and click on copy to filename. Then you can Paste-From filename, which opens the previously pasted text or images, and you can scroll through them. Basically it's the same as using the tiered clipboard with the exception, you can still use copy and paste from clipboard without it opening the saved items on the clipboard first.
Needless to say, in my work I do a whole lot of copy and paste, and found using a file is faster and easier than using the tiered clipboard, especially if you are moving things around and just want to go boom boom boom and be done.

That is one feature of Firefox I've always liked, open different instances of Firefox.
Google used to do that, but now just opens up a new window from the same instance of Google. I think. I don't usually work that way, just use tabs.

I do a few things where I may have 30 to 50 tabs open, often every morning and every evening.
However, when opening tabs containing Flash Player, you are limited by about 10 tabs before Flash Crashes.
It really depends on what is playing in Flash though. To be safe, I hold it at 8 tabs containing Flash content, and also do this twice a day. Part of playing a game I play to relax between work sessions.
The main reason I use Google is because I can scroll between tabs using the mousewheel or by keystrokes.
With Firefox, I have to click on a tab to move to it, can't use the mousewheel.
But Firefox has some other features I like that is not found in Google. Like the ability to copy and paste your history list and the paste picks up the actual URLs of links. You can do all of them at once, or a selected range. With Google it is only one at a time, so it takes forever to copy 50 or 100 links up to a website who uses those links.

I've also learned, some of the things we can do on the Linux version of Google is not available on the Windows version of Google. Why it would be different I don't know. The frau will see me do something and then try it, but it don't work for her. Or me either when I tried to show her how to do it. Can't remember off the top of my head what it was, but it just wouldn't work. But of course, her's can do something mine can't, so I guess we are even, hi hi. Or at least I can't figure out what setting she has that is different that causes it to work the way it does on her computer.

Oh well, I'm quite happy with using FREE Linux, and all the FREE software, hi hi.
That being said, I do support the authors of the programs I use the most. Not much, but I'm just a poor guy.

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Re: Adaptive Advertising (again)

Post by yogi » 08 Mar 2019, 14:48

I too have noted that browsers do not always work the same in Linux compared to Windows. I'm certain they work differently in iOS as well. Then there are all the mobile versions that don't look like any of the desktop versions. LOL

Your comment about Chrome interested me so that I had to look into it to see what really goes on with the processes. I have a program that shows all the running processes (process explorer), something like Windows Task Manager would do but in more detail. I can get the PID's from my program while they are not visible in Task Manager. I have four tabs open in Chrome and that generates about nine different processes. Then I started a new incident of Chrome and ... to my surprise no new processes were created. I guess that should tell me that all the tabs are lumped into one process.

Then I looked at Waterfox, which is a clone of Mozilla's Firefox without the excess baggage. I have nine tabs open and only four processes show up. I specifically changed the settings to run each tab is a separate process but it's not obvious that is actually happening. Then I opened a new incident of Waterfox. Just like Chrome no new processes were added. So, now I'm totally confused. :lol:

Here's a screenshot of the lower left corner of my Windows 10. Of course you have the option to place or remove anything you like from the task bar, but mine is the default. I only add the browser to it and nothing else. As you can see there is an icon that brings up the "Task View Window." Originally only one additional view was possible. They changed that but I don't know how many are allowed now. You can search for Task View and see what comes up, but it is possible that the version of Windows 10 you are using doesn't have this feature.

Image

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Re: Adaptive Advertising (again)

Post by Kellemora » 09 Mar 2019, 12:21

Yes it does have a Task View just like that.
Phunny, if I click on it, I get the message, "Use your PC more to see your activities here."
I opened a document and did a few cut n paste operations.
It worked like normal, when I pasted, no list came up, and only the last thing I selected to copy is what appeared.
I also tried copying a whole sentence, a four word phrase, and a small image. When I went to paste, it only pasted the image since that was the last thing I copied.
I couldn't find anywhere to turn on a multiple clipboard.

As far as the task window goes, I opened Edge, Google Chrome, and already had the document page open.
Checked the Task View and it showed each of those items, tiled side by side.
Had to laugh, when I opened Edge it comes up with a window like Speedtest for browsers.
It naturally showed Edge as the fastest, the Firefox, then Google Chrome.
I couldn't resist the urge to see for myself.
I went to one of my writers websites on Edge and Google Chrome and started a 156meg file download on each.
I started Edge first, the Chrome 5 seconds later. Chrome finished a good 20 seconds ahead of Edge.
I thought perhaps they might be competing for cycle time, so I redid the test, downloading a different 85meg file.
I did Edge first and waited for it to finish. It took 17 seconds. Then I used Chrome, it took 14 seconds. Did it again on Edge and it took 16 seconds, and on Chrome only 12 seconds.
Tried it again after closing and reopening the browsers, got the same results as the second round above.
Chrome was definitely not 27% slower than Edge as they claimed, hi hi.

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Re: Adaptive Advertising (again)

Post by yogi » 09 Mar 2019, 16:59

Edge has some cool stuff built in, but as you point out there is a price to pay. In another thread I wrote about my experiences trying to undo Edge as the default browser in Windows 10. I tried to do that because I got sick and tired of fighting with Edge and all it's quirks. Since I am essentially testing for Microsoft I felt that I owed them a fair evaluation of what was built into the system and thus refrained from installing FireFox or any other browser for a long time. But then I had enough and discovered that I could not make any other browser the default for the system. So I complained about it in their feedback hub and now it is possible to change the default. However, it was pathetic getting messages literally begging me to give Edge a chance and not switch the default.

I've read the same trial results showing Edge to be quick downloading but those tests are done under controlled conditions. My ISP brags about it's 100+MB download speed, but that only happens when you go to their site and use their server to do the test. In practice it's typically half the advertised speed and I am certain they do some throttling even though they deny it. In any case I do have ways to verify what browsers are doing in terms of speed and memory management. I typically don't bother with that kind of evaluation and just go with what works best for my purposes. Right now I settled on using Edge to read about the improvements in the latest download of Windows evaluation software, and I do some instant messaging there too. That's it for Edge as far as I'm concerned. My desktop default is Waterfox which is even better than it's parent, Firefox.

Way back when they first introduced the multiple desktop concept into Windows 10 I tested it out to see how it works. I don't recall all that I did but i know I set up two different desktops and was able to switch between them without losing any data. I don't think I tried to copy-n-paste, which seems like a logical first test. LOL

Since they now claim it to be a feature I'd not be surprised to find the multi-tiered clipboard in next month's update to Windows. I tested it out here when it was first released but could not see a use for it. Then again, I don't do any serious authoring either.

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Re: Adaptive Advertising (again)

Post by Kellemora » 10 Mar 2019, 12:55

I used the Linux version of Chrome and Firefox for a long time, but now use the actual Chrome and Firefox versions.
I think they finally settled their differences to allow this, hi hi.

In the desktop/laptop arena, Microsoft still holds the lead with a 75% user base. They used to be higher until the released Vista, then Win8, but so far Win10 has not changed their market share.
Apple/Mac's are still around 20% market share.
But Linux has climbed up from 3% to 5% market share, some sources say LInux is now at 7% market share.

In the area of Smart Phones, Linux kernel devices take the lead with over 2.7 billion devices in use.
Apple/Mac comes in at 1.3 billion devices in use.
Microsoft is under 350 million devices in use.

In the Public Internet Servers arena, Linux or LAMP, dominates Windows or WAMP, by more than 2 to 1. Windows has been gaining here the past few years, Linux was 5 to 1.

The Supercomputer field is totally dominated by Linux, with 100% of the Top 500 now running Linux.

With much of the world moving on to mobile devices, and companies using mobile devices more heavily, Microsoft is slipping away from the business world. So far they are holding their own on laptops for business use, but as more and more employees do what they can on smart phones first and finish up on the laptop if necessary. Can Microsoft stay in the game much longer?

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Re: Adaptive Advertising (again)

Post by yogi » 10 Mar 2019, 14:29

Microsoft missed the boat when the world turned to mobile computing. It was a major miscalculation on their part, but to be fair about it this change in direction occurred while Bill Gates was transitioning out of the company. When his successor finally took charge, Microsoft's business plan changed too. Their core competency is still OS software and their Office Suite, but they have fully embraced cloud computing and mobile computing. Microsoft has yet to come up with a successful piece of hardware, but their Surface combo is pretty good. Too bad it has to run WIndows 10. LOL They fell on their face twice with trying to market a smartphone and Windows for mobile is just so-so. Many people have predicted the end of Microsoft way before Gates left the building. Well, they are still there and they are the most highly valued company on earth. Being big, successful, and rich doesn't mean you will stay that way forever, but I predict Linux will go the way of the dinosaur well before Microsoft. Not in our lifetimes, of course, but still. :mrgreen:

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Re: Adaptive Advertising (again)

Post by Kellemora » 11 Mar 2019, 11:37

I don't expect Microsoft will go anywhere anytime soon either. They have the money and resources to bring new technology and products to market.
Linux doesn't make anything!
But what they are is a group of thousands of programmers all pooling their resources, time, and expertise to make the devices made by other work better.
By hiding all of their code, and only giving entry doors to programmers, Microsoft may have better control, but they don't have enough eyes and programmers to catch all the problems. All those pesky back doors left open to hackers.
And that is where Linux shines. Millions of eyes watching every little move the programmers make, to ensure no back doors get left open for long.

There is another reason all the Top 100 supercomputers use Linux. It is because they can make changes to the operating systems so they work the way they want them to. This is something they cannot do with proprietary software. And that is the beauty of Open Source, it is 100% versatile and user controlled.

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Re: Adaptive Advertising (again)

Post by yogi » 12 Mar 2019, 08:46

I'll just have to take your word for it that 100 supercomputers use Linux. That tells me Linux has the supercomputer market cornered, which is 100 out of several billion computers in the world. Good for them.

When you talk about supercomputers and suggest Linux is the core of choice, you are dismissing the reality of the largest supercomputer in existence that does not use Linux. It's what Google uses to document the world's activities and their kernel is proprietary. Their entire database operating system is also proprietary and not based on the Linux kernel. I won't even get into the Google network because neither one of us knows enough about it to discuss it. But that too is proprietary.

FOSS is a grand idea. It has made some significant inroads in the computer world. Indeed Microsoft has embraced it as has every other major software producer. I have to question it's intrinsic security because I used to work with servers everyday of my working life and would receive bulletins about vulnerabilities several times a month. You don't hear about that because it's handled by tech ops personnel who get paid to fix things and not belly ache about what works and does not work. If Linux was so secure we would not be reading about the massive data breaches that make the headlines from time to time. Writing viruses for Windows is something wannabe hackers practice on these days, but the efforts being put forth by foreign militaries and governments is targeted at Linux servers.

Each computer engine has it's own benefits and risks. That's why there are so many of them. It's really pointless to argue about which is better because they were all invented for different purposes. While it's all software, kernels, and operating systems, the practical application of each is broad and varied. It's like the old apples and oranges comparison. It's just my observation that Linux isn't ripe yet. LOL

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Re: Adaptive Advertising (again)

Post by Kellemora » 12 Mar 2019, 14:32

I hate doing it this way, but I don't want to retype all of this.

Linux now powers 100% of the world’s 500 fastest supercomputers.

‘The 500 most powerful supercomputers all use Linux.’

That’s according to the latest stats out from supercomputer hawks TOP500, who post a biannual list of the world’s most powerful commercially available computer systems.

Linux has long dominated the TOP500 list, powering the majority of the machines that make it. At last count, back in June, 99.6% (or 498) of the top 500 fastest supercomputers ran Linux,

But as of November 2017 that figure stands at a full 100%: the 500 most powerful supercomputers in the world now use Linux.

The majority of these machines aren’t running your average off-the-torrent desktop distribution, but a bespoke, highly customised, and specialised version of Linux. But a minority do run something more familiar:

5 supercomputers run Ubuntu
20 supercomputers run some form of RedHat Enterprise Linux (RHEL)
109 supercomputers run the RedHat affiliated CentOS
The world’s (current) fastest supercomputer is China’s Sunway TaihuLight, which is powered by a colossal 650,000+ CPUs. This beast of a machine, which runs a customised version of Linux called ‘Sunway RaiseOS’, has a processing speed of 93 petaflops — or the equivalent power of 2 million laptops working in unison.

The machine is expected to become 33% faster in the next few years, boosting its processing prowess to over 120 petaflops.

Finally — a machine capable of running more than one Electron app at a time! ;)


Now for Windows:

The TOP500 project ranks and details the 500 most powerful non-distributed computer systems ... China currently dominates the list with 229 supercomputers, leading the second ... "List of the World's Most Powerful Computing Sites" maintained by Gunter ... Since November 2015, no computer on the list runs Windows.
The above about Windows is from Wikipedia.

Sorry, almost forgot this was still open, was reading up about how Linux swamped UNIX due to it's early requirements of being not for sale or public use. Turns out, this is what prompted Torvolds to create Linux as a free Kernel.
Free being the key word as to why server farms and supercomputers all run Linux.
The individual and separate licenses required to run Windows Server is a nightmare, and each component often has its own licensing agreement based on the number of CPUs, the number of clients, etc. ad infinitum.
It looks to me, based on the things I read from several IT professionals. Greed is what killed Microsoft in the supercomputer and large server farm arena.

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Re: Adaptive Advertising (again)

Post by yogi » 12 Mar 2019, 16:14

I've been watching Microsoft, more or less, since the days the company consisted of Bill Gates and only Bill Gates. I don't recall a time when Microsoft ever had a large presence on the server side of business. They got into it out of necessity but never intended to go head to head with the likes of IBM, HP, Cisco, or anybody else. Microsoft made personal computing accessible to the common man (woman, and child). UNIX and eventually Linux were in a different business and to this day stick to their core competency. IBM no longer makes desktops or any personal computer. Linux is a dwarf in the PC world. None of this is earth shattering news. Linux, or some mutation of it, locked in 500 computers. Windows 10 alone is found on 500 million. Apples and oranges, or just statistics?

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Re: Adaptive Advertising (again)

Post by Kellemora » 13 Mar 2019, 11:27

You do know I live in Tennessee, a stones throw from ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)?

Home of the Titan Supercomputer. However, the brand new SUMMIT Supercomputer currently being installed will be faster and more powerful than the one in China which took the lead a short time ago.
Summit has 4,608 servers, with two 22 core IBM power 9 CPUs on each board.
They chose NVidea for the 27,648 GPUs.

Just the top 500 supercomputers account for over two and a half million servers running LinuxAMP (LAMP).
They are what makes Windows 10 usable on-line, hi hi.

Windows users would be up Schitz Kreek if they could only talk to Windows Servers, hi hi.

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