The End is Near

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Kellemora
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Re: The End is Near

Post by Kellemora » 15 Feb 2019, 11:07

We have a fairly new neighbor who lives across the street and down two houses.
I works in IT, but is not really a systems guy as far as equipment installation.
I can receive his WiFi router signal at 4 bars of 5. While he can't see mine at all.
We have the exact same make and model of router. So he says there is something wrong with my router.
But to make sure, we traded routers for an evening.
Dangdest thing he ever saw. I could see my router at his house at only 3 bars this time, but he still could not see the router in the house.
We talked about the repeater in the attic, and he said the way my house is shielded, I would need a hardwired repeater up in the attic, and/or a hard wired router.
Trouble with that is, as many times as I have to reboot the router after a power outage, I can't climb up there anymore.
Now he said something about using antenna driven router instead.
But we never got around to messing with it. Takes money to go out and buy that stuff, hi hi.

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yogi
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Re: The End is Near

Post by yogi » 16 Feb 2019, 09:39

I might be familiar with what you are talking about, but at first read it sounds like a whole new world of networking to me. LOL Hard wired router? Antenna driven router?

As far as I know all routers are hard wired to an Internet access point. That's your connection to the worldwide web. The router output may be hard wires or antenna or both. In your situation I'd expect a repeater, or series of repeaters, to be connected via a hard wire Ethernet port on the output side of your house router. That would effectively be a branch of your main network in the house. The string of repeaters would end inside your office so that there is nothing but hard wires and amplifiers between your office and the router in your house. Depending on what kind of setup you have in the office you would connect switches, hubs, and/or possibly another router to create a secondary LAN leg. All your office equipment would connect to your leg of the LAN via hard wires or line of sight WiFi. At that range it wouldn't matter what band you are using. You also would not care which neighbors you can see, or who can see you. The point of this setup is to connect the house network to the office network. Outsiders be damned.

All these network elements would be active, i.e., connected to an a/c power source. I suppose loss of power to some routers would require a reset, but my Linksys router doesn't. When there is an outage the router in my office recycles as if it were being hard booted. Of course I also have a switch on the router to turn off the power should I want to do that manually. It retains all the settings after a power down but there is a reset button that can be used to put it back to the factory defaults. The amplifiers between your office and your house should not need to be reset in the event of a power failure. They are amplifiers. No logic or anything to reset. Thus the only items which may need adjusting after a power failure, the routers in your house and office, would be easily accessible.

I'll be the first to admit that I see things in a simplistic fashion, but your network is not simple. :mrgreen:

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Kellemora
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Re: The End is Near

Post by Kellemora » 16 Feb 2019, 12:18

It's not that I try to make things not simple, hi hi. I just try to make it work.
Like you, my Router reboots itself after the power comes back on.
But then there are a couple of Windows computers also on the LAN, and Windows DEMANDS it keeps its old IP Address.
It never fails, since Windows is the slowest to boot up, by the time it does, the IP address it want's is already taken, so it retaliates by popping up a message, MY Favorite IP Address is in use by another machine somewhere, so go kill that machine so I can get my IP address back. I just unplug the LAN cable to my office and reboot the Router, if the Windows machine is happy, I will plug the LAN cable back in, the reboot all the machines in my office if necessary.

Besides my 4-port KVM I have an 8-port LAN Switch, and a couple of USB hubs.
How the Router figures out what all is connected to the single LAN cable that runs down to the house is beyond me.
At one time, I had two Routers, one wired only Router, with a WiFi Router connected to the wired Router. I remember doing this to protect the rest of my LAN from the WiFi. I had it locked out somehow so you couldn't get to the wired LAN through the WiFi Router. It could only connect to the Internet.

Years ago, I had a daisy chain Ethernet, or token ring, whatever it was called. Had to buy these Terminal plugs to put on the unused cable ends. I hated that type of LAN with a passion, so was so glad when they came out with the kind we use now. Just plug n pray, hi hi.

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yogi
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Re: The End is Near

Post by yogi » 16 Feb 2019, 18:19

i don't really think you spend time planning on how to make things complicated. :mrgreen:

I do suspect, however, that you have needs that are not all that common. I'm a little surprised to read that your WIndows machines require a specific IP address. I only have two on my LAN and the IP stays the same most of the time. However it all depends on the DHCP server which in my case is part of the router. You can run DHCP service from anywhere, even a Linux box, but it was convenient for me to just let it be in the Linksys router.

As you must know the IP addresses for each device is 'leased' for a specific amount of time. It's then released for use by any device on the network that wants it. I am not sure what the exact time of my leases are but it's certainly not more than 48 hours. I'm thinking it's actually less. The IP has to be renewed at the end of the lease and that is automatically done. My network would have to be down for more than 48 hours for all the leases to expire, which has in fact happened. When we go on vacation, for example, I turn off the network and disconnect everything.

I know for a fact that the IP addy on the machine I'm using to type this has changed a few times over the course of five years or however long I've owned the Lynksys router. I'm always messing with the network for one reason or another and I can tell when things change. The bottom line is that this Windows 7 desktop doesn't seem to care what it's IP address is, or if it does it never complained to me about it. LOL

My wireless HP printer and the NAS is a different story. Because they are accessed by any number of devices on my LAN, I need to make certain that their IP address is known (static). Since the DHCP server is in my router, that is where I go to reserve certain IP addresses for certain devices. It's done by matching MAC addresses to IP addresses and entering them into a table provided for that purpose. For reasons unknown to me, my virtual box software seems to have an IP address and network of it's own. It's not coming from the router so I have no idea what is going on, but that too is permanent. I've never seen it change. This might be due to the fact that I have the virtual network card set up as a bridge to my main network. Even so, I don't know from where the bridge is getting it's IP address. Anyway, it's news to me that Windows would require a static IP address.

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Kellemora
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Re: The End is Near

Post by Kellemora » 17 Feb 2019, 12:22

Debi's Windows machine, the Windows 7 one she uses since she hated the slow new Windows 10 machine.
Whenever we have a power outage, the Windows 7 machine always comes up and says the IP address is in use by another machine and the network doesn't work. If I reboot the router, it seems to get the IP address it wants and the network starts working.
When I get up to my office, if one of the machines up here is not connected to the LAN, I just reboot it, and always it is given a new IP address.

At one time I did give all of my machines their own static IP address. I think there must have been a problem with the old router getting the DHCP just right which is why. It was also handy to know the IP address when the Network Icon would not bring up the other machines. I could always get to them using the IP address.
But, other than her machine having to be the first from the router, I've not had any LAN problems now in a few years.
Oh, her machine does change IP addresses, but after a power outage, for some reason, it never gets the right one and always says another machine is using it's IP address.
One other quirk too about her machine, Alienware machine. We have to unplug all the usb cables in order for the machine to boot up. If we don't, it just hangs on the bios. Took us forever to figure this out, because if I opened the cover and reseated the power to the HD it would then work. I did this with the machine off of course. But then I read somewhere that if a device connected to the usb ports is not recognized by the bios, it hangs. After it is booted up into windows, I can plug them back in and they don't produce a new hardware found warning, unless I reverse which usb slots they are plugged into, hi hi.

I looked up some info on my router, although it only has 4 wired LAN ports, the book says it can handle up to 250 WiFi connections, with a caveat, too many will slow it down considerably, hi hi. It has an internal antenna, and no external plug to add an external antenna like my other WiFi Router did. In fact, the old one had two foot tall antenna's on it, which were optional over the short standard antennas. Still couldn't reach my garage, hi hi.

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yogi
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Re: The End is Near

Post by yogi » 18 Feb 2019, 18:06

I can only imagine what was going on with your network IP assignments. The DHCP sever will start serving just as soon as it's stable after a power outage. It looks at all the available IP's and starts handing them out as devices on the network call for them. I can't think of a scenario where Windows 7 would be requesting a specific IP address unless you made it static. Then, of course, it will only work on that one address. When you do that, however, the DHCP server must also know certain IP's are reserved.

There are network commands you can execute from the command line that will drop the current IP address and look for a new one. There should be no need for a reboot. You can do the same for the DHCP server if you want to reassign IP's across your entire network.

Any one of those hard wire output ports on your router can have a whole bunch of devices on it. Attaching your garage office to one of them is the scheme I suggested you use. The port impedance is high but I can see how 250 devices might bring it down and kill the output of your router.

Dell (Alienware) is notorious for it's crappy BIOS. It sounds like their USB drivers aren't much better. I suppose it's possible to hang up a system if a device of unknown identity is attached. Most BIOS will just ignore it or give you a warning message on the boot screen.

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Kellemora
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Re: The End is Near

Post by Kellemora » 19 Feb 2019, 12:25

Debi got the Alienware machine greatly used from her son. It is water cooled and sprung a leak, he sent it in for repairs, but bought a new one at the same time. He's a gamer so this machine was hi-end when he bought it ten years ago.
The only thing Debi does on it is her webmail and play Farm Town. She could not play Farm Town on the newest computer I bought for her, it was way to slow to do anything. I don't know how she didn't get frustrated enough with it, but because it was new, she suffered through using it.
The video went out on her machine which is why I bought her a new one. I probably should have bought a video card to see if that would fix it. It is still sitting here in my office on a stool. Plus I have a few others that need repairs. However, they are old and don't have much memory, and probably not a large enough power supply for a new mobo and CPU. At least they can usually reuse my cases when I take them in. But what often happens, the cost of a power supply is higher than buying a new cheap cabinet with the power supply already installed. So I end up with a lot of old boxes sitting around here, hi hi.

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yogi
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Re: The End is Near

Post by yogi » 19 Feb 2019, 13:11

I used to save my retired electronic equipment, computers et. al.. When we moved here I spent a couple days tearing things apart because I didn't want to pay to move junk I'd never use. I separated the electronics, the metal, and the plastic then recycled them all properly. The only thing I did not toss was the first laptop my youngest daughter used. I'm pretty sure it has windows 3.1 on it. Now that I think about it, I don't recall if I ever removed the battery before I put it in storage. Thinking even further, I'm not sure it had a battery. :mrgreen:

That Alienware hardware is indeed aimed at gamers, but I can't see why a serious gamer would go that route. Normally they are sharp people and investigate things before they dive into them. Dell has had a bad reputation ever since they first started making computers. LOL Then, too, some gamers are hackers and like to putz around with broken systems. On rare occasion Dell will accidentally make a great system. Perhaps that's what Debi's son was lucky enough to own.

I hear that a lot of OEM folks slow down their machines deliberately. If that's the case it would be possible to bring them back up to speed. It seems odd that they would do such a thing, but there are settings in Windows that will affect it's performance. They must be there for a reason.

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Kellemora
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Re: The End is Near

Post by Kellemora » 20 Feb 2019, 10:51

I took the computer I bought for Debi to replace her's I burned out the video section in, to see if they could make it run faster. On the phone, the guy said no problem, but after he saw what I bought, he said he can't do much with it. These are custom made for discount stores and they leave a lot of things off the mobo.
For eg. it has no way to install a second hard drive, no Sata port for it. No way to add a card because it has no slots.
It's an Acer Aspire X in the small box. He said they are garbage, and for the same price he could have made me one ten times better.
I used to like Acer stuff, I thought, but I had forgotten, it is ASUS mobo's I usually buy installed in my machines.

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yogi
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Re: The End is Near

Post by yogi » 20 Feb 2019, 12:19

Gigabyte and Asus dominate the top PC motherboard market.

I think I'd get an Acer before a Dell but now that I see what rolling my own does, I'll not buy off the shelf again. The expansion slots are nice things to have on motherboards, but they don't do much for speed. It's the processor and the chip set that does it all. Of course you will not get a high end chip set in a $300 computer and should not expect spectacular performance. Changing the processor and memory is fine, but then the chips that interface to the data buses would be a problem. It's probably cheaper to just buy a new fully loaded motherboard than to upgrade something old.

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Kellemora
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Re: The End is Near

Post by Kellemora » 21 Feb 2019, 12:09

Oh, I agree, nearly all of my computers were built-ups. Those that were not were normally bought used while one of mine was in the shop for repairs. Don't laugh, I was buying two identical computers at the same time for about three buying cycles. I would set them up the same, so I would always have at least one I was familiar with working should one stop.
The time before last, I bought two IMicro cabinets with power supply for 39 bucks, has Asus M2NB8-AM mobo's installed in each, the same CPU and 4 gigs of memory in each. They worked just fine. I picked up one almost identical but in a different cabinet and took 2gigs of memory out of one to add to the new one. Never saw a difference in how they worked, so gave the frau one with 2gigs, used the other with 2gigs as a backup and did my daily work on the one with 4gigs.
I doubt I will fix the one the frau had that the video section burned out in, but someday when I think about it, will take the 2gig stick and add it back to the computer it came out of.

Although I still write for myself, I'm not working for any publishers anymore, so don't really need three computers running to do the same job. There was a reason for my madness, hi hi. It made my job faster and easier than trying to keep everything on one computer. Although now with large split screens and you can move things to different screens from the same computer, the way I did things is now old hat.

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Re: The End is Near

Post by yogi » 21 Feb 2019, 13:42

I can see having two or three monitors attached to one box. Spreading my activities across three screens would be a luxury. But, there is something to be said for having more than one box with separate monitors. I don't do anything rigorous, but I often have half a dozen windows going on this desktop. If all of them were active at the same time, I think the processing power of my system would be tested to the max. Thus a separate box with its hardware not being shared would be appropriate. I kind of have that now where the Windows 10 laptop is running Tweetdeck and IM software while I do other things not in real time here.

You take redundancy to an extreme. LOL Between the desktop, laptop, and now the mobile computer (that can also make phone calls) I can stay online and nearly fully functional if any one of them died. There is only one case where I'm flirting with Fate. I only have one keyboard at the moment. Should it die I'd not have a way to interact with the desktop.

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Re: The End is Near

Post by Kellemora » 22 Feb 2019, 11:00

I'm down to only one new keyboard in the box, and no more meeces as stand-by.
I threw away a whole stack of older keyboards I wore out, but they still worked. Just needed a piece of tape over the holes, hi hi.
I think I might have one of those free keyboards that came with Debi's computer stuck somewhere, but if so, I'm not sure where. I never did like them, no features and not the right weight on the keys for me.

When I'm writing, I put my outline up on a separate computer and monitor. This way it is always in view.
When doing a rewrite, I will split my monitors the one on the top showing my copy of the work, and the bottom monitor where I'm doing the new work. Using a split monitor lets my copy n paste from one screen to the next to save some typing.
If I need to research something, it is usually easier for me to switch computers using the KVM, do the research, and if I need to copy something do it to the NAS so I can fetch it from the computer I'm using for writing.
Sometimes, I will just use the different WorkSpaces so I can move back and forth on the same computer without closing and opening what I'm working on, or dropping it down into the lower panel (systray on Windows).

Old age has slowed me down considerably, hi hi.

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Re: The End is Near

Post by yogi » 22 Feb 2019, 14:41

Old age has slowed me down considerably, hi hi.
You are still moving so that you can't be THAT old. :mrgreen:

Hardly anybody lets me get away with calling myself old. But I am in spite of 70 being the new 40 in this day of modern medicine. I might be thinking as if I were 40, but certainly ain't movin' like it. LOL The point to be made here is that old age is indeed the time to slow down. The body certainly starts to break down, but there are better reasons to slow down the pace. You worked your entire life preparing for this time. Take advantage of it to smell the roses.

That's great advice in general, but when you get down to the specifics it's not always possible to enjoy the fruits of one's many years of labor. I know you are in a tough spot and need all the resources you can get your hands on. But really, you paid all your dues twice over. Your brain, as well as your body, will thank you for the rest. I recently read an article about preserving one's cognitive acuity. Basically it involves exercising the brain. Do that often enough on a regular basis and it tends to ward off Alzheimer's. The way I see it, you don't have any time to give to dementia.

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Re: The End is Near

Post by Kellemora » 23 Feb 2019, 11:36

I hear ya Yogi!
Besides spending all day every day at my computer, when I do take breaks for lunch and dinner, I do jigsaw puzzles, then at night before I fall to sleep I work a few Sudoku and Crossword Puzzles.
I'm not happy unless I'm doing something mentally challenging.

I think they've found a cure for Alzheimers, but will it ever be released is the question.
It's like Cancer. There are over 100 non invasive, no side affects cures for cancer, but none are allowed in this country.
Big Pharma made sure of that.
For anything to be touted as a cure it must pass two impossible tests.
First: It must be Patentable. This knocks out 100% of the Prior Art and all Naturally Occurring methods.
Second: It must be able to be Synthesized. No known natural ingredients work of they are synthesized.
There are many more restrictions which are impossible to overcome as well for the known cures that work.

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Re: The End is Near

Post by yogi » 23 Feb 2019, 14:04

I think we talked about this before. My first question would be for a definition of "cure". The FDA probably would not agree with it, and perhaps that is what you are quoting. From what I understand about cancer, for example, it is similar to old age. There never will be a cure due to the nature of it. Old age symptoms can be delayed as cancer can go into remission. There are drugs that will treat diseases, but it's not clear to me how that is different than a cure. I say that because just about everything humans are capable of catching has the potential to recur. Well, except old age but I'm not sure that's a disease.

To be sure the biggest pharmaceutical companies are represented at the FDA. The corruption in today's politics most certainly has tainted their mission, but I'd be totally flummoxed if somebody had a cure for cancer and it was deliberately being withheld from general distribution. In terms of pure dollars and cents that is an insane proposition. The safety and general well being of the public comes under the FDA's mission, and that is the reason a lot of drugs are not imported nor are unproven "cures" allowed to propagate freely. As you must know there are rigorous testing criteria that must be performed before any drug gets approved by the FDA. That doesn't mean all the medications they approve are effective or safe. But they all have a well documented quality level.

Yesterday I visited with my hematologist. It seems that the old tried and proven anticoagulant I was taking failed. He thus prescribed a very expensive alternative that now forces me into the proverbial donut-hole prematurely. The old drug required a regular blood test to be certain I was in the therapeutic range. The new drug does not require testing. So, I asked the doctor how they know my blood is in the right range. They never test it. He claims there is no test for what this medication does. It works on a different principle than the old drug. That tells me he is relying on what Johnson and Johnson had to go through in order to get this medication approved by the FDA. It met the requirements during the development stage and there is no reason to doubt it still does so many years later. My point is that without the government agency approval criteria, we would be at the mercy of the pharmaceutical companies. And, I don't consider myself cured even now that I have no symptoms. If I stop taking the drugs, I am at very high risk for a stroke.

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Kellemora
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Re: The End is Near

Post by Kellemora » 24 Feb 2019, 16:59

I'm on a few medications myself, one didn't work is why I had the second heart attack, but now I'm on none of them other than an 81mg aspirin as far as any blood thinners go.

I think I mentioned this once before, but will do so again, as it is related to cancer.
Radiology is approved to use an additive that causes the dye markers to go directly to cancer cells and not to normal cells, this is how they can get a picture of where the cancer cells are.
Radiology imaging is not a curative treatment, only an exploratory, so the additive can be used.
However, this same additive is not allowed to be used in Chemotherapy to send the cancer destroying drug directly to cancer cells and not to normal healthy cells. Why? Because it is a naturally produced additive which means it is not patentable, and therefore cannot be used as a curative.

OK, moving on:
The reason I'm super late today is we went to a writers and teachers symposium up near the college, held in an old church used as a public meeting place for all sorts of organizations.
On the left side of the building were students, some following a writing outline and others a few different projects, on the right side were teachers and guests, where we were seated. Those conducting the symposium were in the center of the room with their back to us, but facing the students.
Important, those conducting were only using laptop computers.
The first thing I noticed was those conducting the class could view the desktop screen of every students computer, one at a time to see how they were progressing. They were not controlling what was on the students screens, merely viewing what they had on their laptop screen. Sorta like remote desktop works I guess.

I didn't get much out of the writing part of the symposium as I had hoped. To me this looked more like a sales pitch for a computer program for teachers to buy. The reason I say that, even though we didn't stay for the whole thing, is they began showing those of us on the right side of the room how to add daily classroom assignments into their program. Each days assignments are loaded onto USB sticks and passed out to the students. We were late so I guess we missed the part where they handed out USB sticks to the students. But after they showed this, I noticed every student did have an orange and green usb stick plugged in, the same color he held up.

As we were leaving, early, hi hi. A man was in the hall and just finished talking to someone else. He had the same jacket as those giving the talk. I simply asked him, how they gained access to each of the students computers, because I doubt if they knew how to turn on remote desktop viewing. He said everything is built into the program, and only the days lesson is installed by the teacher. The program gives them access to what the student is doing. He scurried away before I could ask another question.

On the drive home, I got to thinking, surely the students must have connected to the teachers computers via WiFi for something like that to work. The the frau said, it would be great if I could see what you are doing on your computer from down here, so I know if I should interrupt you for dinner or not.
That put me on a different track of thought.
I have two monitors displaying the same thing. I wonder if I could send the video output over wifi to a monitor in the house. Haven't had time to see if that is possible or not, but I know I can send a video output to a projection TV with the right hardware.

I've been to enough churches where they have video displays going up front and in the control booth they see what they want up there on a laptop, but I think this all uses another server computer. Don't know since I never looked into it.
Just things I've tossed around in my head this afternoon.

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Re: The End is Near

Post by yogi » 25 Feb 2019, 08:04

The mind boggles when thinking about how computer technology is expanding at the speed of the internet. There is enough software you can buy, or that is already part of your OS, so that you can duplicate what you saw at the symposium. It most certainly was an elaborate form of remote login. Normally when two parties share a computer remotely both ends of the connection need to physically grant permission, typically by supplying a randomly generated PIN or some such signature. That granting of permission is just a nice thing but not necessary. If both ends of the login have the same software all this verification can be done automatically. Simply running the program is the signature required.

The teacher is most likely the hub of a VPN and thus has access to all the computers on the net. The remote login is automatic, and as the man said all done via the proprietary software he is selling. This is similar to what gamers have been doing for decades. Log into Steam, for example, and you can play a game side by side with dozens of others. In this case a server is involved and you subscribe to log in. Also, a common gamer technique is to simply broadcast what you are doing. This is streaming and is a one way kind of thing that doesn't have any active participation going on. You turn on the stream software on your work station and send it to your NAS. Deb would simply log into the NAS and view the stream. The technique brings to mind how the surveillance function works. In that case the stream is saved (taking up a whole lot of disk space) and not merely sent out to be discarded shortly thereafter.

I've not done any of the above other than remote login to help people fix their computers. There probably are other ways it can be accomplished too. Oh, I take that back. I do have accounts with Steam and a few others, but I've not played any multiuser games. I could, but I don't.

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Re: The End is Near

Post by Kellemora » 25 Feb 2019, 11:15

Supposedly, if the TV has WiFi, one should be able to go to their WiFi and select add a Device, then pick the model of the TV. If the TV does not have WiFi, you can buy an HDMI WiFi Dongle and plug that into the TV.
Wouldn't work for me since my house is like a Faraday Cage, hi hi.

I did find a rather expensive black box you plug into your router, that has an HDMI cable from it to a TV. But the ad wasn't clear enough to see exactly what the device was for. It just said watch on-line video on your TV from your computer through the LAN.

No Biggie, it was just something I played with in my head for a day. Now I'm over it, hi hi.

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Re: The End is Near

Post by yogi » 25 Feb 2019, 13:18

You're talking about delivering the raw video signal on a dedicated cable when you mention HDMI. It's probably a bad idea to do that over any length of wire due to signal loss and/or noise. I didn't think televisions had wifi unless they also had some kind of server built in for that purpose. Perhaps that's what the dongle is all about. I can see Bluetooth in a television monitor, but don't have any feel for whether or not it can handle video. I know audio works very well over Bluetooth. If your television did have that then it would be a no brainer Bluetooth enabling your workstation. I'd be surprised if the Silver Yogi does not have that capability, but then I went out of my way to avoid Bluetooth until I found it useful in cleverphones. Since you are so well shielded the best bet is to avoid any rf connection.

You know about KISS, I'm sure. If you really wanted Deb to know you are ready for dinner I am certain you can put a single multi-colored LED on the kitchen stove. Connect the LED to a switch up in your office. Flip it to turn the LED green when you are ready, red when you do not want to be disturbed, and amber when you are undecided. Simple and requires very little thought. :mrgreen:

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